Lease a Dodge Durango

 

Take a look at any midsize to large crossover SUV and you'll find the basic requirements fulfilled. In no particular order, these include comfort, versatility, Safety Leasing Dodge, generous cargo capacity and an easy-to-drive demeanor. But if you're looking for something extra, the list narrows considerably. The 2013 Dodge Durango happens to be one of those models that delivers more than you'd expect.

 

One of the Durango's most distinguishing traits is its aggressive, muscular styling. In a word, it simply looks tough, and no other SUV in its class has this sort of brawny exterior. To its credit, its attractive sheet metal is backed up with athletic on-road handling that is rare in this segment.

 

To its detriment, however, the 2013 Dodge Durango trails the pack when it comes to cargo and passenger space. With a maximum cargo capacity of 84.5 cubic feet, it's probably enough for most, but competing SUVs offer more. On top of that, the base V6 engine also lacks the punch of its rivals, leading us to recommend the V8 engine if your budget allows.

 

Choosing a Durango over the competition will naturally come down to your priorities, but it's worth noting that the Dodge can be an alternative to the mechanically similar Jeep Grand Cherokee, which only seats five and features even less cargo capacity. More direct competitors can be found in the 2013 Ford Explorer and 2013 Ford Flex. To a lesser degree, the 2013 Chevrolet Traverse is also worth considering. We'd recommend taking a look at all three along with the 2013 Dodge Durango, as they each manage to fulfill the requirements of that oh-so-important SUV checklist.

 

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options Leasing Dodge

 

The 2013 Dodge Durango large crossover SUV is available in four trim levels: base SXT, midlevel Crew, performance-themed R/T and top-of-the-line Citadel.

 

Standard equipment on the SXT includes 18-inch alloy wheels, automatic headlights, foglamps, heated sideview mirrors, full power accessories, cruise control, tri-zone automatic climate control (includes separate rear air-conditioning), a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, a fold-flat front passenger seat, a 60/40-split-folding and reclining second-row seat, a 50/50-split-folding third-row seat and a six-speaker sound system with a CD player, satellite radio and an auxiliary audio jack.

 

The Crew adds remote ignition, a power liftgate, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a cargo compartment cover, power front seats (eight-way driver, six-way passenger), driver-seat memory functions, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, keyless ignition/entry, rear parking sensors, a rearview camera, a 115-volt power outlet, Bluetooth (phone and streaming audio) and an upgraded nine-speaker sound system with a touchscreen display, a USB/iPod interface, digital music storage and voice activation.

 

The R/T essentially includes the upgrades of the Crew (minus the parking sensors and rearview camera) along with a V8 engine, 20-inch alloy wheels, a sport-tuned suspension, body-color accents, xenon headlights, faux suede upholstery and power driver lumbar support.

 

Stepping up from the Crew to the Citadel adds automatic xenon headlamps, 20-inch wheels, a chrome grille insert, automatic wipers, a sunroof, leather upholstery, ventilated front seats, heated front and rear seats, an eight-way power passenger seat, a power-adjustable and heated steering wheel, adaptive cruise control and a navigation system with Sirius Travel Link.

 

Many of the Citadel's luxury features are available on the Crew and the R/T. Options for the whole lineup include second-row captain's chairs, a towing package, a skid-plate package (except R/T) and a rear-seat DVD entertainment system with satellite TV (except SXT).

 

Dodge Lease Powertrains and Performance

 

The 2013 Dodge Durango is offered in several powertrain combinations. You can choose rear-wheel drive, all-wheel drive or four-wheel drive. Except for the V6-only SXT, rear-drive versions offer a choice of V6 or V8 power. The full-time AWD system is only available with the V6 engine. The on-demand 4WD system features dual-range gearing (which makes it more capable on more challenging terrain) and requires the V8 engine.

 

Standard on all but the R/T is the 3.6-liter V6 engine, which is rated at 290 horsepower and 260 pound-feet of torque. A five-speed automatic transmission is standard. In Edmunds performance testing, a V6 Durango went from zero to 60 mph in 9 seconds, a bit slower than most competing crossovers. EPA-estimated fuel economy is 16 mpg city/23 mpg highway and 19 mpg combined for the V6 with either rear- or all-wheel drive.

 

Optional on the Crew and Citadel and standard on the R/T is a 5.7-liter V8 good for 360 hp and 390 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed automatic transmission is standard. The rear-wheel-drive model attains an EPA-estimated 14/20/16 mpg, while the AWD is rated at 13/20/15 mpg.

 

Safety Leasing Dodge

 

Antilock disc brakes, stability and traction control, trailer sway control, front side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags are standard on every 2013 Dodge Durango. The Citadel also comes with blind-spot monitoring and cross-path warning systems, which are both optional on the Crew. In Edmunds brake testing, a Durango Crew came to a stop from 60 mph in 119 feet -- a very good distance for a large crossover.

 

In government tests, the Durango received four out of five stars for overall and frontal crash protection, five stars for side impact protection and three stars in rollover tests. In Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Leasing Dodge tests, the Durango earned a perfect "Good" rating for its performance in frontal-offset, side-impact and roof strength tests.

 

Interior Design and Special Features Dodge Lease

 

Modern and functional, the 2013 Dodge Durango's cabin has been designed with family-style versatility in mind. Regardless of trim level, the design is attractive and features upscale materials.

 

Chrysler's latest batch of digital-entertainment options (a 28GB hard drive, satellite radio and TV) should appeal to both kids and tech-savvy parents; however, the available touchscreen interface isn't the most user-friendly or advanced. The front seats are roomy and comfortable, but the second row has a rather flat cushion (which helps promote a flatter load floor when the seat is folded) and doesn't offer quite as much legroom as roomier rivals. The Durango's easily accessed third row, on the other hand, offers a surprising amount of leg- and headroom (even for 6-footers) and is indeed more spacious than the Ford Explorer's.

 

With the second- and third-row seats folded down, the Durango can carry up to 84.5 cubic feet of cargo. This is a respectable amount, but competing large crossover SUVs can offer even more rear passenger and/or cargo space.

 

Driving Impressions Leasing Dodge

 

The 2013 Dodge Durango is related to the Mercedes-Benz M-Class, and it shows in the way this nearly 5,000-pound vehicle drives down the road. The Durango feels controlled in almost any driving situation, and the responsive nature of the steering makes the Durango easy to maneuver.

 

Low-end torque is not a strong suit of the V6, but once the Dodge Durango is moving, the engine pulls respectably. Midrange acceleration is adequate for passing and merging and indeed there's little reason to sweat the additional second or two it takes the Durango to reach 60 mph compared to its fleeter rivals. As expected, the V8 offers brisk all-around performance. On a long interstate cruise, the Durango provides a quiet and relaxed cabin environment.

Lease a Dodge Challenger

 

There are basically two ways to assess the 2014 Dodge Challenger: You can view it as an homage to classic muscle cars, or you can compare it to other contemporary coupes. Either way, this two-door behemoth generally hits the spot. Pugnacious yet practical, rowdy yet refined, the Challenger possesses a surprisingly diverse skill set. Its sheet metal may be unabashedly retro, but the Challenger has a lot more to offer than just nostalgia.

 

Don't get us wrong: If you're drawn to the Dodge Challenger simply because you miss laying patches in your high school parking lot, you won't be disappointed. We'd avoid the base V6 for this purpose, but either of the two available V8s should do the trick. The R/T's 5.7-liter version delivers up to 376 horsepower and great value, while the SRT8's 6.4-liter, 470-hp monstrosity is an even worthier heir to the big-block V8s of yesteryear. Particularly with the pistol-grip six-speed manual shifter in hand, a V8-powered Challenger hits all the right Woodward Avenue notes.

 

But that's to be expected. What's unexpected is how civilized the Challenger can be. Whereas its principal rivals, the admittedly sharper handling Chevrolet Camaro and Ford Mustang, have tight backseats and firm rides, the larger, softer Challenger will cosset four adult passengers like a luxury sedan. Even the base Challenger V6 makes for a perfectly pleasant cruiser, while the V8 models are kind of like a less wealthy (or more practical) man's Mercedes-Benz CL-Class. If you can forgive its uninspired interior, the 2014 Dodge Challenger will reward you with a uniquely well-rounded variation on the muscle-car theme.

 

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

 

The 2014 Dodge Challenger is a five-seat coupe offered in four main trim levels: SXT, R/T, SRT8 392 and SRT8 Core.

 

The SXT starts with the V6 engine, 18-inch alloy wheels, keyless entry and ignition, full power accessories, cruise control, automatic climate control, a tilt-and-telescoping leather-wrapped steering wheel, a six-way power driver seat (with power lumbar adjustment), a 60/40-split-folding rear seat, a trip computer and a six-speaker sound system with a CD player and an auxiliary audio jack.

 

The optional SXT Plus package adds foglights, automatic headlights, rear parking sensors, leather upholstery, heated front seats, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, illuminated visor mirrors, Bluetooth phone and audio connectivity, and an upgraded sound system with satellite radio and an iPod/USB audio interface.

 

The SXT also offers a number of other packages. The Super Sport Group includes 20-inch chrome wheels (with performance tires); a rear spoiler; a 3.06 rear axle ratio; performance-tuned suspension, steering and brakes; a Sport mode for the transmission and steering-wheel-mounted shift paddles. If that's not sinister enough for you, consider the Sinister Super Sport Group, which substitutes 20-inch painted wheels.

 

Continuing with the SXT packages, the Interior Appearance Group (also offered on R/T) includes metal-accented pedals, a car cover, upgraded floor mats and a T-handle shifter. The Rallye Redline edition is a Super Sport Group variant with the metal pedals, the T-handle shifter, red-accented black wheels, a big red exterior stripe and available red leather upholstery. The Electronics Convenience group includes heated mirrors, remote start and displays for tire pressure and outside temperature. The Sound Group II package features an upgraded seven-speaker sound system, and it can be paired to an optional 6.5-inch touchscreen interface. The optional navigation system employs the same touchscreen.

 

The Challenger R/T reverts to 18-inch wheels, cloth upholstery, non-heated seats and the entry-level speakers, but it upgrades to the 5.7-liter V8 engine and otherwise enjoys the same features as the SXT Plus. The R/T Plus package adds a security alarm, rear parking sensors, and the rest of the features of the SXT Plus that aren't already standard. The R/T Classic package includes the R/T Plus items as well as 20-inch "heritage-style" wheels, black side stripes, functional hood scoops and xenon headlights.

 

The R/T Super Track Pak (not a typo) includes higher-performance suspension/steering/brakes and performance-oriented stability control programming. The R/T Blacktop edition comes with the Super Track Pak and adds black 20-inch wheels, black exterior trim (including the ordinarily silver fuel door) and a "matte graphite" body stripe with red edges. The R/T Redline edition can be had with or without the Super Track Pak, and it features 20-inch black wheels with red trim, a body stripe similar to the Blacktop's, a body-color grille surround, metal pedals and the T-handle shifter (automatic transmission only).

 

Individual option highlights for the SXT and R/T include a sunroof, xenon headlights, an 18-speaker Harman Kardon audio system and a variety of special Mopar parts and styling enhancements.

 

The Challenger SRT8 392 starts with the R/T Plus's basic equipment and adds the 6.4-liter V8 engine, launch control, performance-oriented stability control programming, high-performance brakes and steering, adaptive suspension dampers, xenon headlamps, unique 20-inch wheels, sport seats, an upgraded trip computer with real-time performance data, full hydraulic power steering (versus electrohydraulic in the others), the Sound Group II (including the touchscreen) and a one-day driver training course at the SRT Track Experience. Optional are the navigation system, the sunroof and the thumping Harman Kardon audio system.

 

The SRT8 Core is meant to be a stripped-down, more affordable SRT8 392, so it loses supposedly superfluous standard luxuries like xenon headlights, foglights, the adaptive suspension and Sound Group II. In fact, the Core's interior is closer to the base SXT's equipment level -- it even comes with the entry-level six-speaker audio system.

 

Powertrains and Performance

 

All 2014 Dodge Challengers are rear-wheel drive. The base SXT is powered by a 3.6-liter V6 that produces 305 hp and 268 pound-feet of torque. A five-speed automatic is standard. EPA fuel economy estimates stand at 18 mpg city/27 mpg highway and 21 mpg combined.

 

The Challenger R/T gets a 5.7-liter V8 and a standard six-speed manual transmission that harnesses 376 hp and 410 lb-ft. When hooked up to the available five-speed automatic, the "Hemi" V8's output drops slightly to 372 hp and 400 lb-ft. In Edmunds testing, a manual-equipped Challenger R/T went from zero to 60 mph in 5.5 seconds; the automatic raises that to 5.8 seconds. Quick as they are, both times are still a bit slower than what you can expect from a V8-powered Camaro or Mustang. Fuel economy is 16/25/19 for the automatic, with the manual getting 15/23/18.

 

The Challenger SRT8 models get their swagger from a 6.4-liter V8 that produces 470 hp and 470 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed manual is standard and a five-speed automatic is optional. In Edmunds testing, a manual-equipped SRT8 392 went from zero to 60 mph in 4.5 seconds, which is impressively quick but still a bit off the pace of a similarly powered Camaro or Mustang. Fuel economy estimates are 14/23/17 for either transmission.

 

Safety

 

Every 2014 Dodge Challenger comes standard with antilock disc brakes, stability and traction control, active front head restraints, front side airbags and side curtain airbags. Rear parking sensors are optional across the board, but a rearview camera is not available.

 

In Edmunds brake testing, the SRT8 392 came to a stop from 60 mph in an excellent 106 feet.

 

In government crash testing, the Challenger received a top five-star rating for overall crash protection, with five stars for total frontal impact safety and five stars for total side-impact safety, although there was some concern about a driver door that came unlatched during testing.

 

Interior Design and Special Features

 

In contrast to the Challenger's brash exterior, the interior is oddly generic. A few styling cues, like the large beveled dashboard and distinctive shifter knobs, are reminiscent of Challengers past, but overall, there's a distinct lack of panache. Due to the Challenger's high beltline and chunky rear roof pillars, rearward visibility is also lackluster.

 

We're not enamored of the somewhat crude touchscreen interface, either; it's too bad the related Charger sedan's much larger (8.4-inch) and easier to use touchscreen isn't offered. However, the interior is generally quite functional, and the materials aren't bad. Moreover, the small-diameter, well-contoured steering wheel makes for a pleasant interface between car and driver.

 

The front seats in most Challengers are wide and flat, which doesn't do much for lateral support, but they're comfy for long-distance drives. The SRT8's have better side bolstering and are also covered in leather and faux suede. The backseat is remarkably roomy for two adults, with good headroom and decent legroom. It also features a 60/40 split-folding back, a fold-down armrest and even a middle seat for tiny or exceptionally good-natured folks.

 

At 16.2 cubic feet, the Challenger's trunk is positively enormous for this segment, rivaling some large sedans for hauling capacity.

 

Driving Impressions

 

One of the 2014 Dodge Challenger's signature traits is its excellent ride quality. You could drive this big coupe all day and feel as if you never left your sofa. The default suspension tuning of the base SXT is pretty floaty, however. As such, we recommend going for at least the Super Sport Group's performance-tuned suspension. Sportier Challengers actually handle rather well, though they'll never let you forget about the car's sheer bulk. The Mustang and even the chunky Camaro are noticeably more agile around turns.

 

If you've got one of the V8s under the hood, though, you probably won't be too concerned about the Dodge's cornering characteristics. The R/T's 5.7-liter V8 accelerates smartly and makes lovely noises, while the SRT8's 6.4-liter V8 is off the charts in both respects. We love the pistol-grip manual shifter as well. Pity the aged automatic transmission doesn't rise to the same level. The automatic-only V6 model is obviously less thrilling than the V8s, but with 305 horses on tap, it can hold its own. If you'd rather cruise the boulevard than mix it up with Mustangs on twisty back roads, the easygoing 2014 Dodge Challenger makes a strong case for your hard-earned cash.

 

 

Lease a Dodge Charger

 

You know the old saw about judging books by their covers? Well, we've got a new version: don't judge the 2014 Dodge Charger by its styling. Whether you love the Charger's cartoonishly muscular body or not, there's more to this full-size sedan than meets the eye. It may look like an adolescent boy's four-door fantasy, but the Charger is actually one of the best large sedans we've driven.

 

It's hard to think of something American drivers want that the Charger doesn't have. Interior space? No problem; the Charger's got ample room for 6-footers front and back, though rear headroom can be a bit tight. Ride comfort? The Charger's well-tuned suspension ensures that most impacts barely register in the cabin. Technology? Check out the 8.4-inch touchscreen interface, which is both easy on the eyes and intuitive to operate. Plus, with its rear-wheel-drive layout and available V8 power, the Charger can serve as a legitimate performance car for drivers so inclined. The optional all-wheel-drive system makes it viable for snow-belt shoppers, too.

 

If the Charger has an Achilles' heel, it's fuel economy. Granted, the optional eight-speed automatic returns an impressive 31 mpg on the highway with the V6, but the base Charger V6 and all V8-powered Chargers come with an antiquated five-speed automatic, and fuel economy suffers accordingly.

 

Otherwise, it's hard to find fault with Dodge's big sedan, especially when you consider how much bang for the buck it provides. If you're in the market for a car of this size, we'd also suggest checking out the new 2014 Chevrolet Impala, which lacks the Charger's sporty personality but delivers generous comfort, space and technology; the sleek 2013 Toyota Avalon, which boasts an available 40-mpg hybrid variant; and the surprisingly upscale 2014 Kia Cadenza, as well as the Charger's platform-mate, the more restrained Chrysler 300. But whatever you make of the Charger's in-your-face styling, know that a world-class car lies beneath.

 

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options Leasing Dodge

 

The 2014 Dodge Charger is a full-size sedan offered in SE, SXT, R/T, SRT8 and SRT8 Super Bee trims.

 

Standard equipment on the SE includes 17-inch alloy wheels, a five-speed automatic transmission, automatic headlights, keyless ignition/entry, cruise control, dual-zone manual climate control, a six-way power driver seat, 60/40 split-folding rear seats, a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, a 4.3-inch touchscreen interface and a six-speaker sound system with a CD player, an auxiliary audio jack and an iPod/USB audio interface. Note that Bluetooth can easily be added to the SE via the optional Connectivity Group.

 

The SXT adds an eight-speed transmission (optional on SE), heated mirrors, foglamps, remote ignition, dual-zone automatic climate control, heated front seats, an eight-way power driver seat (with four-way power lumbar adjustment), a leather-wrapped steering wheel, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, an 8.4-inch touchscreen interface, Bluetooth audio and phone connectivity, satellite radio and upgraded speakers. With all-wheel drive, the Charger SXT comes standard with 19-inch wheels.

 

The SXT offers a number of optional packages. The Plus package adds 18-inch wheels, leather upholstery, a heated steering wheel, an eight-way power front passenger seat (with four-way power lumbar adjustment), heated rear seats and LED interior lighting. The Rallye Appearance Group adds a slight power upgrade for the V6, 20-inch chrome wheels, performance tires and brakes, a sport-tuned suspension (rear-wheel-drive only), a rear deck lid spoiler, a Sport mode for the transmission, shift paddles, sport seats and a 10-speaker Beats by Dr. Dre sound system. The Blacktop package is essentially the same as the Rallye but with painted wheels and a blacked-out grille, while the Redline package is essentially the Blacktop package with red trim on the wheels.

 

Since the Blacktop and Redline packages aren't available with AWD, Dodge provides an AWD Sport package with much the same content. All three packages are also offered on the V8-powered R/T.

 

Also available on SXT is the Navigation Group, which includes a Garmin-sourced navigation system and a rearview camera. Opt for the Driver Confidence Group and you'll get rain-sensing wipers, xenon headlights, automatic high-beam control, a driver-side auto-dimming mirror, a blind-spot warning system with rear cross-path detection, the rearview camera and rear parking sensors. The Driver Convenience Group contributes heated and ventilated front seats, driver memory functions, power-adjustable pedals and a power tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel. A sunroof is a stand-alone option.

 

The R/T starts with the SXT's standard equipment and adds a V8 engine with a five-speed transmission, xenon headlights, 18-inch wheels, performance tires, upgraded brakes, the same sport-tuned suspension as the Rallye (rear-wheel-drive only) and sport seats with cloth upholstery.

 

Like the SXT, the R/T trim can be tricked out with numerous options packages. The R/T's Plus package mirrors that of the SXT, while the Road & Track package adds a black grille, 20-inch wheels, a rear deck lid spoiler, upgraded brakes, a driver-side auto-dimming mirror, a Sport mode for the transmission, paddle shifters, leather trim and the Driver Convenience Group mentioned above. The Driver Confidence Group is also available with the Road & Track package, while the Super Track Pak (Road & Track package required) tacks on a performance-oriented three-mode stability control system, performance brakes, sportier steering and an even firmer state of suspension tune.

 

Rounding out the R/T lineup, the R/T Max package essentially starts with the R/T Plus and adds the Navigation, Driver Convenience and Driver Confidence Groups, as well as adaptive cruise control, forward-collision warning, blind-spot warning and rear cross-path warning systems. Note that these features are widely available on other Chargers.

 

The SRT8 ultrahigh-performance model starts with most of the R/T Max's equipment and adds a bigger V8 engine, a three-mode adaptive sport suspension, 20-inch wheels, the three-mode stability control system, launch control, upgraded brakes with red Brembo calipers, a rear spoiler and other racy styling cues. Inside, there's an SRT steering wheel with paddle shifters, exclusive SRT sport seats with leather trim, a color vehicle information center in the gauge cluster with "Performance Pages" and an optional 19-speaker Harman Kardon audio system.

 

The SRT8 Super Bee is a less luxurious, more affordable version of the SRT8, so it starts with most of the base R/T's equipment and adds the bigger V8, 20-inch wheels, unique exterior graphics, black Brembo calipers, "Z-stripe" yellow and silver cloth upholstery with Super Bee logos on the front headrests, and heated rear seats. Notably, the Super Bee is the only Charger other than the base SE that doesn't come standard with the 8.4-inch touchscreen: The 4.3-inch unit is standard, and the bigger screen is only available as an extra-cost option. The Super Bee also makes do with the entry-level six-speaker audio system.

 

Dodge Lease Powertrains and Performance

 

The 2014 Dodge Charger SE and SXT come standard with a 3.6-liter V6 that produces 292 horsepower and 260 pound-feet of torque. Add the Rallye Appearance Group, Blacktop package, Redline package or AWD Sport package, and engine and exhaust tweaks lift output to 300 hp and 264 lb-ft of torque. A five-speed automatic is standard on the SE, while an eight-speed automatic is optional for the SE and standard for all SXTs. Rear-wheel drive is standard, but the SXT can be equipped with all-wheel drive.

 

The SE returns an EPA-estimated 18 mpg city/27 mpg highway and 21 mpg combined. With the eight-speed automatic, fuel economy jumps to a laudable 19/31/23 mpg.

 

In Edmunds performance testing, a rear-drive SXT accelerated from zero to 60 mph in 7.1 seconds, an average time for a full-size sedan.

 

The Charger R/T gets a 5.7-liter V8 good for 370 hp and 395 lb-ft of torque. A five-speed automatic and rear-wheel drive are standard, with all-wheel drive optional for all but the R/T Road & Track. In Edmunds testing, a rear-drive R/T accelerated from zero to 60 mph in 5.4 seconds. EPA-estimated fuel economy is 16/25/19 with rear-wheel drive and 15/23/18 with all-wheel drive.

 

The Charger SRT8 is powered by a 6.4-liter V8 making 470 hp and 470 lb-ft of torque. A five-speed automatic and rear-wheel drive are standard. In Edmunds testing, it hit 60 mph in just 4.6 seconds. Fuel economy predictably brings up the rear at 14/23/17 mpg.

 

Safety Leasing Dodge

 

Standard Safety Leasing Dodge features for the Charger include stability and traction control, antilock disc brakes, front seat side airbags, a driver-side knee airbag, side curtain airbags and active front head restraints. Optional features include a rearview camera, a blind-spot warning system, a rear cross-traffic warning system and a forward collision warning system that comes bundled with adaptive cruise control.

 

In Edmunds brake testing, a Charger SXT with 20-inch wheels came to a stop from 60 mph in 113 feet, a remarkably short distance for a large sedan. An R/T was essentially the same, while the SRT8 with higher-grip summer performance tires (an upgrade over the all-season tires on the others) managed an even shorter 108 feet.

 

In government crash testing, the 2014 Dodge Charger received a top five-star rating for overall protection, including four stars for frontal impacts and five stars for side impacts. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Leasing Dodge awarded the Charger its highest rating of "Good" in the moderate-overlap frontal-offset, side-impact and roof-strength crash tests.

 

Interior Design and Special Features Dodge Lease

 

You might expect the brash-looking Charger to have a cheap interior, but that's decidedly not the case. Dodge uses much better materials now than it did in the first-generation Charger, and the result is a surprisingly upscale environment. We also like how the center stack is angled toward the driver, a welcome change from the related Chrysler 300's relatively flat dashboard. Another highlight is the 8.4-inch touchscreen interface, which features user-friendly virtual buttons, an intuitive menu structure and crisp, colorful graphics. Shame it doesn't come standard on the SE or Super Bee, as the default 4.3-inch unit in those models is much less satisfying.

 

The Charger's imposing dimensions provide every passenger with a luxurious amount of space, though the car's rakish rear roof line can restrict headroom for taller backseat occupants. Also keep in mind that compared to front-wheel-drive full-size sedans, the Dodge has less available legroom in the rear center seating position due to intrusion from the transmission tunnel. In addition, the trunk's 15.4-cubic-foot volume is merely adequate for a large sedan, though 60/40-split-folding rear seatbacks are standard for occasions when you need more room.

 

Driving Impressions Leasing Dodge

 

The 2014 Dodge Charger's standard 3.6-liter V6 is quite pleasant, delivering satisfying power with only faint hints of coarseness. However, we strongly recommend pairing it with the eight-speed automatic, which shifts wonderfully and yields superior fuel economy besides. The base SE's workaday five-speed automatic is frankly outclassed by most rivals.

 

Unfortunately, both of the Charger's available V8 engines are also stuck with a five-speed automatic, but that's where the negatives stop. The R/T's 5.7-liter V8 delivers plenty of poke for most folk, and although we wouldn't mind more rumble from the exhaust, you'll hear a nice throaty roar if you put the windows down. As for the SRT8, it's a lunatic, delivering its matching 470 horses and torque with unmistakably American gusto.

 

Unlike classic Dodge Chargers, the latest model brings more to the table than just strong acceleration. Its supple suspension calmly soaks up rough pavement, although, opting for the 20-inch wheels and tires will result in a firmer ride. Meanwhile, the Charger's noise insulation and high-speed stability are beyond reproach. In corners, body motions are admirably well-controlled, though you'll want one of the sportier models for maximum fun. Overall, if you need a large sedan in this price range, you'll be hard-pressed to find one that's as rewarding to drive as the 2014 Dodge Charger.