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Lease a GMC Sierra 1500 Extended Cab

 

Much like an older athlete who's "still got it," the 2013 GMC Sierra 1500 pickup can hold its own against younger rivals. Last redesigned six years ago, the GMC Sierra 1500 faces fresher-faced foes from Dodge and Ford. But thanks to its core strengths, it remains a solid choice for a full-size pickup.

 

When it comes to towing capacities and offering a wide array of trim levels and body styles, the GMC Sierra 1500 gives nothing away to its rivals. It also boasts a smooth, quiet ride and comfortable seating, making it ideal for road tripping.

 

Those looking for just a basic truck, however, will find competitors provide more attractive cabins and more powerful base engines. Specifically, while other brands have considerably boosted the output of their trucks' base six-cylinder engines, the Sierra's weak V6 soldiers on unchanged and struggles to move such a heavy vehicle.

 

Do some further cross-shopping and you'll find that the Ford F-150 offers more high-tech features, the 2013 Ram 1500 has a nicer interior and even smoother ride, and the 2013 Toyota Tundra crew cab is roomier inside. Yet for most pickup truck shoppers, the 2013 GMC Sierra 1500 remains a well-rounded choice and deserves attention in this very competitive segment.

 

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options Lease a GMC

 

The 2013 GMC Sierra 1500 is offered in standard cab, extended cab and crew cab body styles. Standard cabs and extended cabs are available with either a standard 6-foot-6 bed or an 8-foot long bed. Crew cabs only come with a short 5-foot-8 bed.

 

Regular cabs can be had in base Work or midlevel SLE trims. An SL trim slots in between the Work and SLE and is available in extended and crew cab styles, as is the well-appointed SLT trim. The range-topping Denali is crew cab only.

 

The Work trim comes with air-conditioning (for extended- and crew-cab versions), a trip computer, a tilt steering wheel, cruise control, OnStar telematics, vinyl seat upholstery, a 40/20/40-split front bench seat and a CD/MP3 stereo with an auxiliary audio jack and satellite radio. The SL adds full power accessories, keyless entry, cruise control, satellite radio and adjustable lumbar support for the driver.

 

The SLE trim adds upgraded seat upholstery, a lockable compartment with a power outlet built into the center cushion of the split front seat, an auto-dimming rearview mirror and a leather-wrapped steering wheel. The premium SLT piles on chrome-clad alloy wheels, a premium interior with a full center console and premium materials, a Bose audio system (with iPod/USB input), leather seat upholstery, remote engine start, an exclusive dash design with wood and metallic accents, 12-way power-adjustable/heated front seats and rear audio controls.

 

Sierra Denali models trump the SLT with a unique powertrain, suspension tuning emphasizing ride comfort, 20-inch wheels, exterior styling enhancements, a heated steering wheel and a turn-by-turn navigation feature for OnStar.

 

Option availability varies with trim levels and body styles. It includes several towing packages, the Z71 Off-Road package (skid plates and an off-road suspension), special regional packages, the All-Terrain package (similar to the Z71 but with special interior and exterior enhancements) and the XFE (extra fuel economy) trim variant for the rear-wheel-drive 5.3-liter V8 crew cab. The XFE features aerodynamic enhancements and lightweight aluminum components that slightly improve fuel economy.

 

Other options include 20- and 22-inch wheels, a rear back-up camera, upgraded audio systems, Bluetooth, a navigation system with real-time traffic, a rear-seat entertainment system, heated power-folding outside mirrors, a sunroof, a power-sliding rear window, rear parking sensors and ventilated front seats. An "EZ-Lift" tailgate is also offered and requires only about half the effort to open and close compared to the standard tailgate.

 

Lease a GMC Powertrains and Performance

 

The 2013 GMC Sierra 1500 is available with four different engine choices. In the Work trim level, the Sierra is powered by a standard 4.3-liter V6 that produces 195 horsepower and 260 pound-feet of torque. Buyers may upgrade to a 4.8-liter V8 that makes 302 hp and 305 lb-ft, or a 5.3-liter V8 that's good for 315 hp and 335 lb-ft. The SLE trims will have one of the two V8s as standard, while the SLT has the 5.3-liter engine as standard.

 

A 6.2-liter V8 is available on select models and produces 403 hp and 417 lb-ft of torque. The 6.2 V8 comes standard on the Denali. A six-speed automatic transmission is standard on the two big V8s, while the 4.8-liter V8 and the V6 come only with a four-speed automatic. In a recent Edmunds test of an essentially identical Chevy Silverado equipped with the 6.2-liter V8, it accelerated from a standstill to 60 mph in 6.6 seconds, which is quick for a full-size pickup. Properly equipped, a Sierra 1500 can tow up to 10,700 pounds.

 

Buyers have a choice of two-wheel drive, four-wheel drive and all-wheel drive (Denali only). The Work and LS trims with 4WD have a traditional floor-mounted selector for the transfer case. All other 4WD trims have Autotrac, which features an automatic setting that shifts into 4WD when it detects the tires slipping.

 

Fuel economy estimates range from 15 mpg city/22 mpg highway and 18 mpg combined for a crew cab XFE down to 12/18/14 mpg for the Denali.

 

Safety Leasing a GMC

 

Standard Safety Leasing a GMC equipment includes antilock brakes (front disc, rear drum) and stability control. Front, side and side curtain airbags are also standard. Four-wheel disc brakes are available as part of the Max Trailering package. In Edmunds brake testing, a Silverado crew cab with four-wheel disc brakes stopped from 60 mph in a short 120 feet.

 

In government crash tests, the 2013 GMC Sierra received an overall score of four stars (out of five). It earned four stars for overall frontal crash protection and five stars for overall side crash protection. In Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Leasing a GMC testing, a Silverado crew cab earned a top score of "Good" for frontal-offset crash protection and a second-best score of "Acceptable" for side-impact testing.

 

Lease GMC Interior Design and Special Features

 

On the whole, the Sierra's interior fit and finish ranks highly, though base models tend to look rather dull compared to their rivals. The fancy SLT and Denali trims dress up the cabin significantly, with a unique upscale dash and door panel treatment, a full center console and attractive wood grain and metallic accents. Crew cab models feature comfortable rear seats with flip-up seat cushions that provide a nearly flat load floor. Interior storage is merely adequate, with small cupholders and haphazard organization for the center console.

 

Driving Impressions Leasing GMC

 

As with other full-size pickups, the 2013 GMC Sierra 1500 is generally pleasant to drive. The steering is light but reasonably precise, and the truck's comfortable seats and smooth, quiet ride make road trips enjoyable. The Sierra's turning circle is a bit larger than you'll find in most other trucks, however.

 

Acceleration is sluggish with the base V6, while the 4.8-liter V8 provides adequate power. The 5.3-liter V8 feels brawny and the 6.2-liter V8 turns the Sierra into a veritable muscle truck. The six-speed automatic transmission that comes standard with the two bigger V8s does an admirable job of keeping power on tap, while the four-speed feels outdated by comparison.

 

Lease a GMC Terrain 

 

The 2013 GMC Terrain is the effective twin of General Motors' Chevrolet Equinox, but its generally higher content and better-appointed cabin place it in the middle ground between mainstream and luxury compact crossovers. The Terrain's size ? larger than most compact crossovers but not quite as large as midsize models -- also makes it a 'tweener and an intriguing option for those seeking a little more stretch-out space and a little more luxury than most everyday compact crossovers provide.

 

Edging the 2013 Terrain even closer to the luxury end of the spectrum is the debut of the Terrain Denali, an all-encompassing, high-content trim level GMC has offered with great success in its other model lines. The Denali trim comes loaded with virtually all the optional features of the other Terrain trims, leaving it up to the buyer to choose from just a few extras (such as a navigation system) and powertrain configuration (standard four-cylinder or optional V6 engine and front- or all-wheel drive). The Denali also offers unique exterior and interior treatments to further differentiate it from other Terrain trims.

 

Also shifting the 2013 Terrain closer to premium brand entries is the new 3.6-liter dual-cam V6, whose 301 horsepower is greater than what many luxury compact crossovers offer. The larger and more powerful V6 comes at no extra cost at the gas pump, however. Despite being 14 percent stronger, this 3.6-liter V6 delivers the same fuel-economy ratings as the 3.0-liter V6 it replaces.

 

When it comes to the small crossover SUV segment, you're not exactly hurting for choices. If you want a bit more cargo capacity at a lower price, the 2013 Honda CR-V and 2013 Kia Sorento are solid picks. Alternately, the 2013 Ford Escape and Volkswagen Tiguan would be better if you want something that's more involving to drive. For similar money, you could move a size up and consider the Dodge Journey, Ford Explorer and Nissan Murano. Overall, though, we like the Terrain, finding it to be an intriguing middle ground for those who want most of the utility of a midsize crossover along with extra refinement and features.

 

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options Lease a GMC

 

The 2013 GMC Terrain is available in SLE, SLT and Denali trim levels. The SLE and SLT trims are further subdivided into two levels: SLE-1 and -2 and SLT-1 and -2.

 

Standard equipment for the base SLE-1 trim includes 17-inch alloy wheels, heated sideview mirrors, auto-dimming rearview mirror, a rearview camera, cruise control, a power height-adjustable driver seat, a sliding and reclining backseat, tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, OnStar, Bluetooth phone connectivity and a six-speaker sound system with a 7-inch touchscreen interface that includes satellite radio, an auxiliary audio jack and an iPod/USB interface.

 

The SLE-2 trim adds roof rails, automatic climate control, an eight-way power driver seat with power lumbar adjustment, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, upgraded cloth upholstery, an upgraded eight-speaker Pioneer audio system and GM's IntelliLink user interface (that allows voice command for some phone and audio functions). The Safety Leasing a GMC package (lane-departure warning, forward-collision alert and rear park assist) can be added, as can the Convenience package with its heated front seats and remote engine start.

 

The more feature-laden SLT-1 includes the Convenience package plus leather upholstery. Moving to the SLT-2 brings 18-inch chromed wheels, a sunroof, the Safety Leasing a GMC package, a height-selectable power liftgate, chrome exterior trim, charcoal-chrome grille and driver-seat memory functions.

 

The new Denali trim incorporates everything standard for the SLT-2, but adds Denali-specific wheels, rear cross-traffic and side blind-zone alert systems, an eight-way power passenger seat and special exterior/interior trim details.

 

A navigation system is optional for all Terrains except the SLE. A dual-screen DVD rear-entertainment system is available for SLT-2 and Denali.

 

Lease a GMC Powertrains and Performance

 

The standard engine for every 2013 GMC Terrain is a 2.4-liter four-cylinder that produces 182 hp and 172 pound-feet of torque. It is backed by a six-speed automatic transmission. Optional for any Terrain except the SLE-1 is a 3.6-liter V6 that churns out a hefty 301 hp and 272 lb-ft of torque, both significant increases over the Terrain's former 3.0-liter V6. This engine also is backed by a six-speed automatic transmission; the combination can tow 3,500 pounds. Also optional for any four-cylinder or V6 Denali is all-wheel drive.

 

The four-cylinder, front-wheel-drive Terrain returns an EPA-estimated 22 mpg city/32 mpg highway and 26 mpg combined. With all-wheel drive, those numbers drop to 20/29/23.

 

Meanwhile, despite being almost 40 hp stronger than last year's V6, the new 3.6-liter V6 manages the same fuel economy; front-wheel-drive models are rated at 17/24/20 and all-wheel drive stands at 16/23/19.

 

In Edmunds testing, we clocked a front-wheel-drive four-cylinder Terrain from zero to 60 mph in 9.4 seconds, an average time for the class.

 

Safety Leasing a GMC

 

The 2013 GMC Terrain is fitted with standard antilock brakes, stability and traction control, front-seat side-impact airbags, side curtain airbags and a rearview camera. Also standard is GM's OnStar emergency communications system, which includes automatic crash notification, an emergency assistance button, remote door unlock and stolen vehicle assistance. Lane departure warning, collision warning, rear park assist, blind-spot monitoring and cross-traffic alert are standard or optional, depending on the trim level.

 

The Terrain brakes confidently. In Edmunds testing, a four-cylinder Terrain came to a stop from 60 mph in 121 feet, a few feet shorter than average.

 

In government crash tests, the Terrain earned an overall score of four stars (out of five), with four stars for total frontal impact protection and five stars for total side-impact protection. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Leasing a GMC gave the Terrain the best possible rating of "Good" in its frontal-offset, side-impact and roof-strength tests.

 

Lease GMC Interior Design and Special Features

 

GMC might still be perceived as a "truck" brand, but the 2013 Terrain's nicely appointed interior is anything but rugged to the eye or to the touch. The dashboard is styled in two graceful curves and the gauges and secondary controls are highlighted by soft blue backlighting, while soothing ambient light oozes around other interior spaces.

 

The 7-inch color touchscreen display that's standard even on the base Terrain is symbolic of GMC's aim to make the Terrain a cut above everyday compact crossovers. The audio system has a customized menu that can also be enhanced with the IntelliLink system, which uses Bluetooth streaming audio to enable integration of smartphone apps such as Pandora and Stitcher. The screen's menus are well organized, but the system's occasional slow or missed responses to touch inputs can be frustrating.

 

Particularly noticeable is the attention to sound deadening in the Terrain. An acoustic windshield and other noise-killing measures -- including an active noise-cancellation system for four-cylinder models -- work wonders in muting tire and wind noise, even during high-speed cruising. The front bucket seats are comfortable and all occupants relish in the Terrain's wide cabin. Utility is maximized by the 2013 Terrain's standard sliding rear seat, which allows you to quickly optimize either rear seat legroom or rear cargo space, depending on your needs.

 

That said, even considering the Terrain's almost-midsize footprint, it's not entirely efficient with its interior space. With the rear seats folded, the Terrain's 63.7 cubic feet of maximum cargo capacity is noticeably less than that of the Honda CR-V, Hyundai Santa Fe and Toyota RAV4. Outward visibility is also below-average.

 

Driving Impressions Leasing GMC

 

The 2013 GMC Terrain's six-cylinder power is so markedly improved that the standard four-cylinder is difficult to deliberately select, particularly for those who envision using the Terrain for ferrying lots of passengers or towing a trailer. The fact that the new 3.6-liter engine's extra power comes with no fuel efficiency penalty compared to the Terrain's former 3.0-liter V6 only makes the decision to go with the Terrain's four-cylinder engine even more difficult.

 

Furthermore, the Terrain's near-luxury aspirations seem to almost require V6 power to complement its high-end styling and features. But the main issue is that the Terrain is not a particularly light example of the breed, so the 182 hp churned out by the hard-working four-cylinder will likely satisfy only those whose chief concern is eking out a few more miles per gallon.

 

The 2013 Terrain's refined ride and cozy interior are the payoff for the extra weight, however. The Terrain glides over road warts that leave more utilitarian rivals feeling out of sorts and it boasts a hushed cabin at interstate cruising speeds. The new Terrain Denali gets special rear shocks to further cushion the ride, but don't expect any Terrain to handle with particular sharpness. Comfort, refinement and high content are the 2013 GMC Terrain's calling cards.

 

Lease a GMC Yukon

 

If you're shopping for a full-size SUV, you probably already know that the 2014 GMC Yukon effectively is the mechanical twin to the Chevrolet Tahoe. But there are differences, the most obvious being the Yukon's different front and rear sheet metal, additional standard equipment and more upscale interior appointments -- particularly if you go for the highfalutin Denali version.

 

Like its Chevy relative, GMC's Yukon is one of the dwindling choices for a traditional full-size SUV that rides on a beefy truck frame and has standard V8 power and available four-wheel drive. Those attributes orient the Yukon more for those who plan to tow a boat or camper, or load it up with heavy cargo on a regular basis.

 

Even with this focus on utility, GMC has made sure it keeps up with customers' expectations for refinement and everyday ease of use. Without question, the Yukon is a big, heavy vehicle that's more at home on rural roads than city streets, but thanks to its quiet interior and comfortable ride, it's quite pleasant to drive for the most part. Inside, there are good-quality materials, modern controls and a mostly up-to-date suite of electronics. One key gripe about the interior is the third-row seats' lack of fold-flat capability: You have to remove them and store them in your garage when you need more room.

 

If you are considering a SUV more for its people-hauling capacity, a lighter-duty crossover is likely to be a better choice. There are many crossovers with three rows of seats, just like the Yukon. One of our top picks for a full-size crossover is in the same showroom, in fact: the 2014 GMC Acadia. The Acadia seats up to eight and actually has more cargo volume than the Yukon.

 

If big-time towing (as much as 8,500 pounds) or off-road travel is on your list of requirements, though, the 2014 GMC Yukon is a fine choice. Its main rival is the Toyota Sequoia, which presents a very similar mix of ruggedness and refinement. Also, bear in mind that a redesigned GMC Yukon arrives for the 2015 model year, and among its many upgrades will be a more powerful and efficient V8 engine and a stow-away third-row seat. If you're set on buying a large, traditional SUV before then, though, the current Yukon remains an appealing option for consumers who need seating capacity and utility in large helpings.

 

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options Lease a GMC

 

The 2014 GMC Yukon is a full-size SUV with three rows of seats. Eight-passenger seating is standard, but optional seating configurations allow the Yukon to accommodate as many as nine occupants or as few as seven. There are three trim levels available: SLE, SLT and Denali. There is an extended-length version known as the Yukon XL covered in a separate review.

 

The SLE comes standard with 17-inch wheels, a locking rear differential, roof rails, automatic headlights, running boards, heated outside mirrors, a remote ignition, tri-zone automatic climate control, cruise control, six-way power front bucket seats (manual recline), a leather-wrapped tilt-only steering wheel, power-adjustable pedals, Bluetooth phone connectivity, a rearview camera, rear parking sensors, OnStar and a nine-speaker Bose sound system with satellite radio, iPod/USB interface, auxiliary audio jack, CD player and rear seat headphone jacks. The SLE can be optioned with a 40/20/40-split three-person front bench seat that raises seating capacity from eight to nine.

 

The SLT adds foglights, leather upholstery, the Convenience package and the expanded availability of optional content. Options include an Off-Road Suspension package, heated eight-way power front seats with driver memory, ventilated front seats and a navigation system (with traffic updates, music storage and an auto-dimming rearview mirror). The SLT-2 Equipment package adds a power liftgate, power-folding mirrors, a heated steering wheel, heated second-row seats and a second-row power seat release. You can also swap out the standard second-row bench seat for optional captain's chairs, dropping seating capacity to seven.

 

The Denali includes all the above, except for the Off-Road package. It also comes with 20-inch alloy wheels, an upgraded adaptive suspension (with load-leveling in the rear), unique styling cues, additional interior sound insulation, a blind-spot warning system and a 10-speaker surround-sound Bose audio system.

 

Some of the features on upper trims are available as options on the lower trims, while a sunroof and rear-seat entertainment system are optional for every Yukon. All trim levels come standard with a tow package; an integrated trailer brake controller is optional.

 

Lease a GMC Powertrains and Performance

 

The 2014 GMC Yukon SLE and SLT are powered by a 5.3-liter V8 good for 320 horsepower and 335 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed automatic transmission is standard, and buyers have their choice of rear-wheel drive or a four-wheel-drive system that features a two-speed transfer case with low-range gearing for driving off-road or in heavy snow.

 

In Edmunds testing, a 4WD Chevrolet Tahoe ? the 2014 Yukon's mechanical twin ? went from zero to 60 mph in 8.5 seconds. Regardless of whether you choose rear- or four-wheel drive, EPA-estimated fuel economy is 17 mpg combined (15 mpg city/21 mpg highway). Depending on drivetrain and equipment, the Yukon can tow as much as 8,500 pounds.

 

The GMC Yukon Denali gets a 6.2-liter V8 that produces 403 hp and 417 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed automatic with manual-shift capability is standard. Rear-wheel drive is standard and all-wheel drive is optional. The AWD system is not intended for serious off-road use, as it features only a single-speed transfer case.

 

In Edmunds testing, the mechanically similar Cadillac Escalade with the same engine went from zero to 60 mph in a quick 7.5 seconds. EPA-estimated fuel economy for the 2014 Yukon Denali is 15 mpg combined (13 city/18 highway). A properly equipped Yukon Denali can tow up to 8,300 pounds.

 

Safety Leasing a GMC

 

The 2014 GMC Yukon comes standard with antilock brakes, stability control, front-seat side airbags, side curtain airbags and OnStar emergency telematics. Rear parking sensors and a rearview camera are standard on all Yukons, while a blind-spot warning system is standard on the Denali and optional on the SLT.

 

In government crash testing, the Yukon earned an overall rating of four stars (out of a possible five), with five stars for overall frontal crash protection and five stars for overall side crash protection.

 

In Edmunds brake testing of the similar Chevy Tahoe, the stop from 60 mph took 134 feet, an average distance for this type of vehicle.

 

Lease GMC Interior Design and Special Features

 

The 2014 GMC Yukon has the high-quality cabin materials you'd expect in a premium-badged SUV, while the gauges are large and easy to read. The front seats and second-row captain's chairs are wide, comfortable and remarkably supportive. Just about everyone except for those in the rearmost seats will enjoy more than adequate space to stretch out, though as is often the case, adults aren't likely to be happy in the third row for very long.

 

You will notice that the Yukon's cabin is starting to feel dated in a few areas. The available navigation system is straightforward in its operation, but its display is smaller than in many newer GM vehicles. In addition, there's standard Bluetooth connectivity for your phone, but not for streaming music. And the Yukon's steering wheel doesn't telescope, which makes it hard to find your ideal driving position, though the standard power-adjustable pedals help somewhat.

 

The GMC's ability to handle up to nine occupants remains a rarity, even among full-size SUVs, but it's less impressive as a cargo hauler, because the third-row seats don't fold into the floor, as is the case in competitors. The only way to get the most out of the Yukon's commendable 109 cubic feet of cargo capacity is to remove the rather heavy third-row seats -- and then find a place to store them.

 

Driving Impressions Leasing GMC

 

Apart from its obvious tough-duty capability, the 2014 GMC Yukon is an effortless and serene interstate hauler. Short of a luxury sedan, it's tough to find a quieter cabin, with noise from the V8 engine remote and muffled, even when accelerating.

 

The Yukon's suspension provides a supple ride and absorbs most of the bumps and ruts that come its way. At the same time, it controls body motions well enough to keep the big vehicle steady around turns. Bounding through traffic isn't one of the Yukon's strengths ? nor should you expect it to be ? mainly because its steering is on the slow side and not especially precise. However, with a 39-foot turning radius, parking the GMC isn't as difficult as you might expect.

 

For those who tow frequently, the Autoride adaptive suspension, which is standard on the Denali and optional on the SLT, comes highly recommended, as its load-leveling rear air suspension helps keep the back end of the vehicle from sagging when pulling heavy loads. Another good reason to make the move to the Denali trim, of course, is the extra grunt from the potent 6.2-liter V8.

 

Lease a GMC Acadia

 

A vehicular jack-of-all-trades, the 2014 GMC Acadia can handle it all. GMC's family hauler is ideal for transporting your big brood to the lake or hauling a full load of provisions away from your local big box store. Large crossovers are good like that, combining much of the passenger- and cargo-hauling abilities of a minivan with the rugged good looks and (when equipped with all-wheel drive) the foul-weather capability of a traditional SUV. In this highly competitive segment, the Acadia stands as one of the best picks.

 

In addition to its spacious interior, the GMC Acadia earns high marks for its comfortable ride, easy-going driving demeanor and 288-horsepower V6, which provides ample thrust for daily commutes and long interstate runs alike. Of course, the Acadia is not exactly unique, as Buick's Enclave and Chevy's Traverse share the same basic platform, engine and seating layout, and differ mainly in their styling and equipment details. The Chevy has the lowest starting price, while the luxury-themed Buick packs the most standard features. The Acadia offers an agreeable middle ground, along with ruggedly handsome styling that reflects the brand's truck heritage. Choosing one of the three will likely come down to your styling preference, pricing and your experience at the dealership.

 

Although the GMC Acadia and its cousins are tough to beat if you need lots of space (and don't really want a minivan), we'd also suggest considering the highly regarded Ford Flex and the more athletic handling and nearly as spacious Mazda CX-9. The Dodge Durango, Hyundai Santa Fe and Nissan Pathfinder are also solid picks in this price range, though they don't offer quite as much interior room as the aforementioned models. With so many choices out there for a three-row crossover, narrowing down your list of candidates can be tough. For families who need eight-passenger seating above all else, though, it's hard to go wrong with the 2014 GMC Acadia.

 

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options Lease a GMC

 

The 2014 GMC Acadia is a large crossover SUV offered in three basic trims: SLE, SLT and Denali. The SLE is further subdivided into SLE-1 and SLE-2, while the SLT is subdivided into SLT-1 and SLT-2 trims.

 

An eight-passenger seating configuration with a second-row bench seat is standard on the base SLE-1 and optional on the rest, which have a standard seven-passenger configuration with second-row captain's chairs.

 

The SLE-1 comes standard with 18-inch wheels, automatic headlights, a rearview camera, rear parking sensors, rear privacy glass, keyless entry, cruise control, rear manual air-conditioning control, a leather-wrapped tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, OnStar telematics, Bluetooth phone connectivity, a 6.5-inch touchscreen display and a six-speaker sound system with a CD player, satellite radio, HD radio, a USB port and an auxiliary audio jack. There are also dual USB charge-only ports on the rear of the center console.

 

The SLE-2 adds remote vehicle start, a power liftgate, an eight-way power driver seat (with two-way lumbar), a two-way power passenger seat (manual recline), an auto-dimming rearview mirror and the Intellilink electronics interface that includes voice controls, Bluetooth audio connectivity and smartphone app integration.

 

The SLT-1 adds 19-inch wheels, foglamps, variable-effort steering, heated mirrors, tri-zone automatic climate control, leather upholstery in the first and second rows (third row vinyl), heated front seats, an enhanced trip computer, rear-seat audio controls and a 10-speaker Bose sound system.

 

The SLT-2 includes power-folding mirrors, driver memory functions, an eight-way power passenger seat and access to additional options. These add-ons include ventilated front seats and the Technology package, which adds xenon headlights, a head-up display and cargo area audio controls.

 

The Denali includes all of the SLT-2's optional items, plus unique styling flourishes inside and out, 20-inch chrome-clad wheels, a panoramic sunroof, forward collision alert system, lane departure warning system, increased sound insulation and a wood-trimmed steering wheel.

 

That sunroof is optional on all other Acadia trims except the SLE-1. The same goes for the rear-seat entertainment system, which includes a Bose surround-sound audio system and a 110-volt power outlet. The SLT trims and the Denali can also be equipped with a navigation system.

 

Lease a GMC Powertrains and Performance

 

Every 2014 GMC Acadia is powered by a 3.6-liter V6 that produces 288 hp and 270 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed automatic and front-wheel drive are standard, but all-wheel drive is optional.

 

In Edmunds performance testing of the related Buick Enclave (with all-wheel drive), we measured a 0-60 mph time of 8.6 seconds, which is on par with other large crossovers with a base V6.

 

The EPA estimates a front-drive Acadia will return 19 mpg combined (17 city/24 highway). All-wheel-drive models drop to 18 combined (16 city/23 highway).

 

Safety Leasing a GMC

 

Antilock disc brakes, traction and stability control, front seat side-impact airbags, side curtain airbags, a rearview camera and rear parking sensors are standard on every Acadia. All but the SLE-1 also have a front-center airbag that inflates between the driver and right front passenger for additional protection in a side-impact collision.

 

The standard OnStar system includes automatic crash notification, on-demand roadside assistance, an emergency button, stolen vehicle locator and active intervention, and remote door unlock.

 

The SLT-2 and Denali also feature standard side blind-spot monitoring and cross-traffic alert. The Denali comes standard with forward collision alert and lane departure warning systems, which are optional on the SLTs.

 

In government crash tests, the Acadia earned a top five-star rating for overall performance, with five out of five stars earned for total front-impact protection and five stars for total side-impact protection. The Acadia also fared well in Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Leasing a GMC crash tests, where it got the highest rating of "Good" in moderate-overlap frontal-offset, side-impact and roof-strength tests.

 

Lease GMC Interior Design and Special Features

 

The 2014 GMC Acadia features an attractive interior, as most of the surfaces you're likely to touch or lean an elbow on are padded and of solid quality. Typical for a three-row vehicle, the Acadia's rearward visibility is almost nonexistent when you have a full crew on board, so the standard rearview camera is a huge help.

 

In most models, entertainment, phone and navigation functions are controlled by a touchscreen interface in the dash called Intellilink. It provides smartphone radio app integration and features a clean layout and intuitive menu structure. Intellilink is sometimes slow to process touch inputs (and in a few instances, wholly unresponsive), however, which can make it frustrating to use.

 

Front occupants will enjoy abundant head- and legroom, as will second-row occupants, but the middle row seat cushions are mounted low, reducing comfort for adults. Sliding those seats all the way back alleviates this issue, but effectively kills third-row legroom. The slide release is also difficult to access. The narrow, flat-cushioned third-row seats are easily deployed and stowed, but are best suited to kids and smaller adults.

 

The Acadia scores points for generous cargo capacity. Even with the third-row seats in place, it can carry up to 24 cubic feet of luggage. That figure jumps to 70 cubes with the third-row seats folded flat and a cavernous 116 cubes with the second row stowed.

 

Driving Impressions Leasing GMC

 

Like the other large crossovers from General Motors, the 2014 GMC Acadia delivers a nice balance between secure handling and a comfortable ride. Even so, you're always aware that this is a large, heavy vehicle (the Acadia weighs nearly 5,000 pounds with all-wheel drive), and it feels a little more cumbersome in the parking lot than other large crossovers.

 

The V6 engine provides adequate performance but lacks punch during authoritative passing maneuvers. It can also sound harsh and unrefined under hard acceleration. In addition, the automatic transmission can be slow to react when a quick downshift is needed, though its gearchanges are at least smooth. Most owners will get used to these characteristics, but if you want more in the way of performance, a CX-9 or Flex is probably more your speed.