Lease a Honda Accord Coupe

 

It's always a major occasion when the Honda Accord comes due for a redesign. The Accord is one of the best-selling cars in North America, and this midsize sedan and coupe are snapped up at a rate of more than 1,000 a day. Fully overhauled, the 2013 Honda Accord is new from the inside out.

 

The new Accord is slightly smaller than the car it replaces, yet it's still among the most spacious and accommodating cars in its class. Interior materials have been upgraded, and the revamped cabin is stocked with the connectivity features that today's consumers expect. Of course there are significant mechanical changes, too, and they've resulted in an Accord that delivers strong performance, outstanding fuel economy and precise handling.

 

After a long wait, Honda has finally added power- and efficiency-enhancing direct-injection technology to the Accord's standard 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine. The four-cylinder is now paired with a continuously variable transmission (CVT) that takes the place of a conventional automatic transmission. The engine and the CVT work so well together that most drivers will be perfectly happy with the change, especially since the CVT-equipped Accord earns an EPA-estimated 27 mpg city/36 mpg highway and 30 mpg combined rating, which are excellent numbers for a conaventional gasoline-powered midsize sedan and even better than those of the diminutive Honda Fit.

 

The 2013 Honda Accord's styling is a careful evolution from its predecessor, and to our eyes, it's visibly less bulky. Inside, the design is cleaner and more coherent, and even base LX models set you up with Bluetooth, a USB input and Pandora integration for smartphones. Further up the ladder is the new HondaLink connectivity system, which integrates Internet audio streaming, social media applications and cloud-based content through iPhone and Android apps. Yet there's still plenty of get-it-done sedan functionality here, too, as you'll find plenty of storage slots and a big trunk.

 

Although we consider this a highly effective redesign, the 2013 Honda Accord is just one of many excellent choices for a midsize car. The revamped Nissan Altima has a sportier personality and slightly higher fuel economy ratings with its base four-cylinder engine. The Toyota Camry and Volkswagen Passat offer similar interior space and a softer ride (depending on the trim level), while the Kia Optima offers impressive value for this class. And it's hard to ignore the stylish bodywork on the Ford Fusion. Narrowing down your choices in this group won't be easy, but if you want a midsize sedan that does nearly everything right, the Honda Accord should be on your list.

 

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options Lease Honda

 

The 2013 Honda Accord is available as a midsize sedan and coupe. Four-cylinder sedans come in five trims: LX, Sport (new for 2013), EX, EX-L and EX-L with Navi. Opt for the Accord's 3.5-liter V6 and three trims are offered: EX-L, EX-L with Navi and Touring.

 

The 2013 Accord coupe comes in LX-S, EX, EX-L and EX-L with Navi, while the V6-equipped coupe comes only in EX-L and EX-L with Navi trims.

 

The base four-cylinder LX comes with 16-inch alloy wheels, dual-zone automatic climate control, full power accessories, cruise control, an 8-inch video display, Bluetooth (phone and audio), a rearview camera, cruise control, a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, a height-adjustable manual driver seat, a folding rear seat and a four-speaker sound system with a CD player, an auxiliary audio jack, iPod/USB audio interface and Pandora functionality.

 

Opting for the new Sport trim brings a bit more horsepower, 18-inch wheels, a rear spoiler, an eight-way power driver seat (with power lumbar) and a leather-wrapped steering wheel with shift paddles for the CVT. Compared to the LX, the Accord EX trim gets you 17-inch wheels, heated mirrors, a sunroof, keyless ignition/entry, the power driver seat, the leather-wrapped steering wheel, Honda's new LaneWatch blind-spot display and a six-speaker sound system.

 

The EX-L trim adds leather upholstery, driver-seat memory functions, a four-way power passenger seat, forward-collision and lane-departure warning systems, a more sophisticated rearview camera, an auto-dimming rearview mirror and a premium seven-speaker sound system with satellite radio and smartphone app integration (HondaLink). The EX-L with Navi adds, as you can likely guess, a navigation system with voice recognition.

 

The EX-based trim levels for the 2013 Honda Accord sedan with the V6 engine are pretty similar to those for the four-cylinder EX models. The V6-exclusive Touring sedan tops the range, combining LED headlights and adaptive cruise control with the equipment from the EX-L with Navi.

 

For the coupe version of the 2013 Honda Accord, the base LX-S trim is similar to the LX sedan. The coupe's EX trims are also comparable in terms of equipment, though the V6-powered EX-L has 18-inch wheels.

 

Powertrains and Performance Honda Lease

 

Most of the front-wheel-drive examples in the Accord range are fitted with the 2.4-liter inline-4, whether sedan or coupe. For all coupes and sedans except the Sport trim, the engine generates 185 horsepower and 181 pound-feet of torque, some 8 hp and 20 lb-ft better than the previous base-model Accord's four-cylinder. The Sport trim's less restrictive dual exhaust frees up the engine to the tune of 189 hp and 182 lb-ft of torque.

 

The standard transmission paired with the four-cylinder for the LX, Sport and EX sedans and LX-S and EX coupes is a six-speed manual. Optional for the four-cylinder sedans and coupes and standard for the four-cylinder EX-L sedan and coupe trim is Honda's newly developed CVT. With it, the EPA estimates the 2013 Accord will average 27 mpg city/36 mpg highway and 30 mpg combined. The Accord Sport automatic, with its slightly more powerful engine, returns 26/35/29. The four-cylinder Accord with the six-speed manual gets 24/34/28.

 

The 2013 Accord's 3.5-liter V6 is upgraded this year and now develops 278 hp and 252 lb-ft of torque. Backed by a conventional six-speed automatic, the V6's fuel economy numbers are still quite impressive at 21/34/25. With the V6 running through the six-speed manual transmission in the Accord EX-L coupe, fuel economy drops to 18/28/22.

 

With the four-cylinder, performance is markedly improved. In Edmunds testing, a four-cylinder Accord EX sedan with the CVT accelerated from zero to 60 mph in 7.5 seconds, a very good time for the class. The V6 is notably strong; an EX-L V6 sedan we tested sprinted to 60 mph in just 6.1 seconds.

 

Safety Honda Lease

 

Every 2013 Honda Accord comes with antilock disc brakes, stability and traction control, active front head restraints, front seat side airbags and side curtain airbags. Blind-spot monitoring, lane-departure and forward-collision warning systems are available on upper trim levels.

 

Worthy of particular mention is the LaneWatch blind-spot system (EX trim and above), which instantly switches the 8-inch screen's display to a low and expansive view of the passenger side of the car when the right turn signal is engaged. A camera in the right-side mirror dedicated to this function provides a confidence-inspiring view, and acclimating to catching the view in the center-dash display is quick and natural.

 

In Edmunds testing, a 2013 Accord sedan braked from 60 mph to a standstill in 128 feet, a slightly longer-than-average distance for a midsize family sedan.

 

In government crash testing, the Accord sedan received five out of five stars for overall and side crash protection, but four stars for frontal protection. The coupe actually earned five stars across the board. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Honda Lease gave both body styles the best possible rating of "Good" in the frontal-offset, side and roof strength tests. In the Institute's new "small overlap front crash" test, the sedan received a "Good" rating, while the coupe got a second-best "Acceptable." This is particularly noteworthy, as most vehicles have scored poorly in this new test.

 

Lease a Honda Interior Design and Special Features

 

When the revised Civic debuted last year, we were disappointed in its interior quality. Matters are much improved for the 2013 Honda Accord. With a few exceptions, the materials have a high-quality look and feel, while the overall cockpit design is elegant and well-constructed enough for a luxury car.

 

The center stack embraces the spirit of legibility with an effective three-tier layout. At the top is the 8-inch display that offers varying levels of information depending on trim level and the presence of audio/navigation. Meanwhile, the main instrument binnacle contains the right amount of information and not too much.

 

Despite the Accord's slightly smaller exterior dimensions, its interior room remains impressive. There is plenty of leg and shoulder space for front occupants, and rear-seat passengers should be quite comfortable and happy. Road and tire noise -- often a Honda bugaboo -- are noticeably reduced in the 2013 Accord thanks in part to two active noise-cancellation systems plus improved aerodynamics. We're also fond of the visibility afforded by the Accord cabin, which offers a lower beltline, slimmer roof pillars and a generous amount of glass.

 

The 2013 Accord's trunk -- at 15.8 cubic feet -- is more than 1 cubic foot larger than before. The Accord coupe has a 13.4-cubic-foot trunk.

 

Driving Impressions Leasing a Honda

 

Most Honda Accord buyers choose a four-cylinder engine, and you won't be disappointed in the new direct-injected 2.4-liter, which revs willingly and delivers its power in a smooth and satisfying manner. Although CVTs don't have the best reputation for refinement, Honda's new unit is the best of the breed, as it responds quickly in highway passing situations and then lets the engine rpm drop back smoothly when your need for quick acceleration has passed. It's so refined that most passengers mistake the CVT for a regular automatic transmission the first time they ride in the 2013 Accord. Of course, if you simply don't like CVTs, you could always get the V6 engine, which comes with a conventional six-speed automatic. Equipped with the V6, the Accord feels downright fast.

 

The 2013 Accord should be a front runner if you're looking for a midsize sedan or coupe that strikes a near-perfect balance between a supple ride and engaging handling. Although the Accord has never been a truly sporty car, this latest version feels particularly well-balanced around turns. The Accord's new electric-assist power steering might feel pretty light the first time you turn the wheel, but it's precise, with a crisp response that adds to the enjoyment of driving the car. One potential downside is the Accord's firm ride quality: If you're accustomed to a softer ride, a Camry or Passat might suit you better in this regard.

 

Lease a Honda Accord Sedan

 

It's always a major occasion when the Honda Accord comes due for a redesign. The Accord is one of the best-selling cars in North America, and this midsize sedan and coupe are snapped up at a rate of more than 1,000 a day. Fully overhauled, the 2013 Honda Accord is new from the inside out.

 

The new Accord is slightly smaller than the car it replaces, yet it's still among the most spacious and accommodating cars in its class. Interior materials have been upgraded, and the revamped cabin is stocked with the connectivity features that today's consumers expect. Of course there are significant mechanical changes, too, and they've resulted in an Accord that delivers strong performance, outstanding fuel economy and precise handling.

 

After a long wait, Honda has finally added power- and efficiency-enhancing direct-injection technology to the Accord's standard 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine. The four-cylinder is now paired with a continuously variable transmission (CVT) that takes the place of a conventional automatic transmission. The engine and the CVT work so well together that most drivers will be perfectly happy with the change, especially since the CVT-equipped Accord earns an EPA-estimated 27 mpg city/36 mpg highway and 30 mpg combined rating, which are excellent numbers for a conventional gasoline-powered midsize sedan and even better than those of the diminutive Honda Fit.

 

The 2013 Honda Accord's styling is a careful evolution from its predecessor, and to our eyes, it's visibly less bulky. Inside, the design is cleaner and more coherent, and even base LX models set you up with Bluetooth, a USB input and Pandora integration for smartphones. Further up the ladder is the new HondaLink connectivity system, which integrates Internet audio streaming, social media applications and cloud-based content through iPhone and Android apps. Yet there's still plenty of get-it-done sedan functionality here, too, as you'll find plenty of storage slots and a big trunk.

 

Although we consider this a highly effective redesign, the 2013 Honda Accord is just one of many excellent choices for a midsize car. The revamped Nissan Altima has a sportier personality and slightly higher fuel economy ratings with its base four-cylinder engine. The Toyota Camry and Volkswagen Passat offer similar interior space and a softer ride (depending on the trim level), while the Kia Optima offers impressive value for this class. And it's hard to ignore the stylish bodywork on the Ford Fusion. Narrowing down your choices in this group won't be easy, but if you want a midsize sedan that does nearly everything right, the Honda Accord should be on your list.

 

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options Lease Honda

 

The 2013 Honda Accord is available as a midsize sedan and coupe. Four-cylinder sedans come in five trims: LX, Sport (new for 2013), EX, EX-L and EX-L with Navi. Opt for the Accord's 3.5-liter V6 and three trims are offered: EX-L, EX-L with Navi and Touring.

 

The 2013 Accord coupe comes in LX-S, EX, EX-L and EX-L with Navi, while the V6-equipped coupe comes only in EX-L and EX-L with Navi trims.

 

The base four-cylinder LX comes with 16-inch alloy wheels, dual-zone automatic climate control, full power accessories, cruise control, an 8-inch video display, Bluetooth (phone and audio), a rearview camera, cruise control, a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, a height-adjustable manual driver seat, a folding rear seat and a four-speaker sound system with a CD player, an auxiliary audio jack, iPod/USB audio interface and Pandora functionality.

 

Opting for the new Sport trim brings a bit more horsepower, 18-inch wheels, a rear spoiler, an eight-way power driver seat (with power lumbar) and a leather-wrapped steering wheel with shift paddles for the CVT. Compared to the LX, the Accord EX trim gets you 17-inch wheels, heated mirrors, a sunroof, keyless ignition/entry, the power driver seat, the leather-wrapped steering wheel, Honda's new LaneWatch blind-spot display and a six-speaker sound system.

 

The EX-L trim adds leather upholstery, driver-seat memory functions, a four-way power passenger seat, forward-collision and lane-departure warning systems, a more sophisticated rearview camera, an auto-dimming rearview mirror and a premium seven-speaker sound system with satellite radio and smartphone app integration (HondaLink). The EX-L with Navi adds, as you can likely guess, a navigation system with voice recognition.

 

The EX-based trim levels for the 2013 Honda Accord sedan with the V6 engine are pretty similar to those for the four-cylinder EX models. The V6-exclusive Touring sedan tops the range, combining LED headlights and adaptive cruise control with the equipment from the EX-L with Navi.

 

For the coupe version of the 2013 Honda Accord, the base LX-S trim is similar to the LX sedan. The coupe's EX trims are also comparable in terms of equipment, though the V6-powered EX-L has 18-inch wheels.

 

Powertrains and Performance Honda Lease

 

Most of the front-wheel-drive examples in the Accord range are fitted with the 2.4-liter inline-4, whether sedan or coupe. For all coupes and sedans except the Sport trim, the engine generates 185 horsepower and 181 pound-feet of torque, some 8 hp and 20 lb-ft better than the previous base-model Accord's four-cylinder. The Sport trim's less restrictive dual exhaust frees up the engine to the tune of 189 hp and 182 lb-ft of torque.

 

The standard transmission paired with the four-cylinder for the LX, Sport and EX sedans and LX-S and EX coupes is a six-speed manual. Optional for the four-cylinder sedans and coupes and standard for the four-cylinder EX-L sedan and coupe trim is Honda's newly developed CVT. With it, the EPA estimates the 2013 Accord will average 27 mpg city/36 mpg highway and 30 mpg combined. The Accord Sport automatic, with its slightly more powerful engine, returns 26/35/29. The four-cylinder Accord with the six-speed manual gets 24/34/28.

 

The 2013 Accord's 3.5-liter V6 is upgraded this year and now develops 278 hp and 252 lb-ft of torque. Backed by a conventional six-speed automatic, the V6's fuel economy numbers are still quite impressive at 21/34/25. With the V6 running through the six-speed manual transmission in the Accord EX-L coupe, fuel economy drops to 18/28/22.

 

With the four-cylinder, performance is markedly improved. In Edmunds testing, a four-cylinder Accord EX sedan with the CVT accelerated from zero to 60 mph in 7.5 seconds, a very good time for the class. The V6 is notably strong; an EX-L V6 sedan we tested sprinted to 60 mph in just 6.1 seconds.

 

Safety Honda Lease

 

Every 2013 Honda Accord comes with antilock disc brakes, stability and traction control, active front head restraints, front seat side airbags and side curtain airbags. Blind-spot monitoring, lane-departure and forward-collision warning systems are available on upper trim levels.

 

Worthy of particular mention is the LaneWatch blind-spot system (EX trim and above), which instantly switches the 8-inch screen's display to a low and expansive view of the passenger side of the car when the right turn signal is engaged. A camera in the right-side mirror dedicated to this function provides a confidence-inspiring view, and acclimating to catching the view in the center-dash display is quick and natural.

 

In Edmunds testing, a 2013 Accord sedan braked from 60 mph to a standstill in 128 feet, a slightly longer-than-average distance for a midsize family sedan.

 

In government crash testing, the Accord sedan received five out of five stars for overall and side crash protection, but four stars for frontal protection. The coupe actually earned five stars across the board. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Honda Lease gave both body styles the best possible rating of "Good" in the frontal-offset, side and roof strength tests. In the Institute's new "small overlap front crash" test, the sedan received a "Good" rating, while the coupe got a second-best "Acceptable." This is particularly noteworthy, as most vehicles have scored poorly in this new test.

 

Lease a Honda Interior Design and Special Features

 

When the revised Civic debuted last year, we were disappointed in its interior quality. Matters are much improved for the 2013 Honda Accord. With a few exceptions, the materials have a high-quality look and feel, while the overall cockpit design is elegant and well-constructed enough for a luxury car.

 

The center stack embraces the spirit of legibility with an effective three-tier layout. At the top is the 8-inch display that offers varying levels of information depending on trim level and the presence of audio/navigation. Meanwhile, the main instrument binnacle contains the right amount of information and not too much.

 

Despite the Accord's slightly smaller exterior dimensions, its interior room remains impressive. There is plenty of leg and shoulder space for front occupants, and rear-seat passengers should be quite comfortable and happy. Road and tire noise -- often a Honda bugaboo -- are noticeably reduced in the 2013 Accord thanks in part to two active noise-cancellation systems plus improved aerodynamics. We're also fond of the visibility afforded by the Accord cabin, which offers a lower beltline, slimmer roof pillars and a generous amount of glass.

 

The 2013 Accord's trunk -- at 15.8 cubic feet -- is more than 1 cubic foot larger than before. The Accord coupe has a 13.4-cubic-foot trunk.

 

Driving Impressions Leasing a Honda

 

Most Honda Accord buyers choose a four-cylinder engine, and you won't be disappointed in the new direct-injected 2.4-liter, which revs willingly and delivers its power in a smooth and satisfying manner. Although CVTs don't have the best reputation for refinement, Honda's new unit is the best of the breed, as it responds quickly in highway passing situations and then lets the engine rpm drop back smoothly when your need for quick acceleration has passed. It's so refined that most passengers mistake the CVT for a regular automatic transmission the first time they ride in the 2013 Accord. Of course, if you simply don't like CVTs, you could always get the V6 engine, which comes with a conventional six-speed automatic. Equipped with the V6, the Accord feels downright fast.

 

The 2013 Accord should be a front runner if you're looking for a midsize sedan or coupe that strikes a near-perfect balance between a supple ride and engaging handling. Although the Accord has never been a truly sporty car, this latest version feels particularly well-balanced around turns. The Accord's new electric-assist power steering might feel pretty light the first time you turn the wheel, but it's precise, with a crisp response that adds to the enjoyment of driving the car. One potential downside is the Accord's firm ride quality: If you're accustomed to a softer ride, a Camry or Passat might suit you better in this regard.

 

 

Lease a Honda Civic Coupe

 

The 2013 Honda Civic proves that Honda is no slouch when it comes to acting on constructive criticism. The Civic was redesigned just last year, but the overhaul was panned as being too slight to give the car any real advantage in the very competitive compact car segment. This year, Honda responds by sprucing up the Civic with improvements that address the previous model's biggest flaws.

 

The most obvious changes are the styling upgrades, which give the car a sportier look that's also more distinctive compared to the previous-generation car. Inside the cabin, many of the cheap plastics that drew fire last year have been replaced with materials that boast a more high-end look and feel. The design is largely the same, though, meaning it lacks some of the visual pizzazz and sophistication of some rivals.

 

Also important to note in the cabin is the significantly expanded standard features list. Additional included amenities now include Bluetooth, a rearview camera, text message functionality, an iPod interface and Pandora functionality. Most of these items are often options on competitor vehicles as well.

 

There are mechanical revisions as well. Honda recalibrated the suspension and steering for more responsive handling, and added additional sound-deadening material for a quieter ride. On the Safety Honda Lease front, the new Civic benefits from an updated body structure that's said to provide better frontal impact protection, revised front-seat side airbags, and the addition of optional forward collision warning and lane departure warning systems for the Civic Hybrid model. These are also very rare items in this price range.

 

So the 2013 Honda Civic is now truly up to speed with its well-dressed and fully loaded rivals, which means the list of excellent choices in this segment just got a little bit longer. We'd still suggest looking at some of our other favorites, including the 2013 Ford Focus, 2013 Hyundai Elantra and Mazda 3, as they're competitive in terms of value, feature content and interior quality. Civic Hybrid shoppers will find the Toyota Prius C and Volkswagen Jetta Hybrid to be strong alternatives. And gearheads hankering for the Civic Si should test-drive the Ford Focus ST, Mazdaspeed 3 and Volkswagen GTI since they still have the edge in most performance categories.

 

Overall, however, we're impressed with the revitalized Honda Civic, and it's once again among the top choices for a small sedan or coupe.

 

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options Lease Honda

 

The 2013 Honda Civic is a compact car offered in coupe and sedan body styles.

 

The standard Civic coupe and sedan come in LX, midrange EX and top-of-the-line EX-L trims. The sedan is also available in a fuel-efficient HF trim.

 

Entry-level LX models come equipped with 15-inch steel wheels, full power accessories, air-conditioning, a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, a one-piece fold-down rear seatback and cruise control. Electronic features include a 5-inch central display screen, a rearview camera, Bluetooth phone and audio connectivity, SMS text messaging functionality and a four-speaker (six for the coupe) sound system with a CD player, an auxiliary audio jack, an iPod/USB audio interface and Pandora radio functionality.

 

The fuel-efficient HF sedan starts out with standard features similar to those of the LX sedan, then adds a few upgrades designed to deliver maximum mpg. These include low-rolling-resistance tires and aerodynamic cast-aluminum wheels, wind-cheating underbody panels and a rear spoiler.

 

The EX model adds to or supplants those features with 16-inch alloy wheels, rear disc brakes, a sunroof and 60/40 split-folding rear seatbacks. EX coupes get an upgraded seven-speaker sound system, while EX sedans step up to a six-speaker sound system. The EX-L model adds foglights, automatic headlights, heated mirrors, leather upholstery and heated front seats.

 

The Civic Natural Gas is available in one trim whose features largely mirror those of the LX.

 

The Civic Hybrid sedan is available in two trim levels, with the base model's list of standard features being similar to those of the mainstream EX sedan. The Hybrid also comes with forward collision warning and lane departure warning. The top-of-the-line "Leather" trim level for the Hybrid adds extras found on the regular EX-L.

 

The sporty Si coupe and sedan come in a single trim level that includes 17-inch alloy wheels, a bigger engine, a limited-slip front differential, a sport-tuned suspension, foglights and front and rear spoilers. Inside upgrades include most of the items from the EX model's standard features list plus front sport seats, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, an aluminum shift knob and red backlit gauges.

 

A navigation system with voice controls, satellite radio and real-time traffic updates is optional on all Si, Natural Gas and Hybrid models, and on EX and EX-L sedans and coupes.

 

Powertrains and Performance Honda Lease

 

The front-wheel-drive 2013 Honda Civic is powered by a 1.8-liter four-cylinder engine that puts out 140 horsepower and 128 pound-feet of torque. Transmission choices include a five-speed manual and an available five-speed automatic (HF and EX models get the automatic as standard equipment). With the automatic, the Civic returns an EPA-estimated 28 mpg city/39 mpg highway and 32 mpg combined. With the manual these numbers are slightly lower at 28/36/28, whereas they go up to 29/41/33 on the HF model. In Edmunds performance testing, a Civic EX went from zero to 60 mph in 9.3 seconds -- an average time for this segment.

 

The Civic Natural Gas features a version of the same 1.8-liter engine powered by, as its name suggests, natural gas. It produces only 110 hp and 106 lb-ft of torque, however. A five-speed automatic is standard. EPA-estimated fuel economy is the gasoline equivalent of 27/38/31 mpg.

 

The Civic Hybrid gets a 1.5-liter gasoline four-cylinder engine and an electric motor, a combination that's good for 110 hp and 127 lb-ft of torque. A continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT) is standard. In Edmunds testing, it hit 60 mph in 10.1 seconds -- on par with most economy hybrids. Not surprisingly, this powertrain is the most fuel-efficient of the bunch, with EPA numbers of 44/44/44.

 

The Civic Si's engine provides output of 201 hp and 170 lb-ft. A six-speed manual is the only transmission offered. EPA fuel economy estimates stand at 22/31/25. In Edmunds testing, an Si coupe hit 60 mph in 6.9 seconds, which is slower than average among sport compacts.

 

Safety Honda Lease

 

The 2013 Honda Civic comes with standard Safety Honda Lease features that include stability control, antilock brakes (four-wheel discs with the EX and Si), front side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags. Forward collision warning and lane departure warning systems are standard on the Civic Hybrid.

 

In Edmunds brake testing, a 2013 Civic EX came to a stop from 60 mph in a longish 130 feet. A 2012 Civic Hybrid was a bit better with a stop of 124 feet. At 120 feet, the 2012 Civic Si stopped the shortest for us, but this is still a disappointing distance considering the car was fitted with summer performance tires; other so-equipped sport compacts fared better.

 

The government updated its scores for the 2013 Civic coupe and sedan. The sedan received a perfect five stars overall, with four stars for frontal and five stars for side crash categories. The 2013 Civic coupe received four stars overall, also with four stars for frontal and five stars for side crash categories. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Honda Lease gave the 2013 Civic sedan and coupe the highest possible rating of "Good" in its frontal-offset, side and roof strength tests, as well as its highest "Top Safety Honda Lease Pick+" award.

 

Lease a Honda Interior Design and Special Features

 

Inside its cabin, the 2013 Honda Civic maintains its familiar two-tier dash display, which includes a 5-inch monitor that displays information for audio, hands-free phone use and various vehicle systems. Materials quality gets a noticeable upgrade this year, and anyone who bemoaned the cheap look and feel of the dash material, switchgear and door panels in last year's Civic will be glad to know that it has been replaced with more textured, premium-looking alternatives.

 

Most of the cabin's controls are well-placed, and the keypads and menu buttons on the steering wheel are intuitive enough for anyone who's spent time with a smartphone. But it's an overload of input sources; there can be up to 14 buttons and directional commands on the steering wheel alone, and the dash design with the optional navigation system looks quite busy. In addition, the nav system, although useful for finding addresses, is largely antiquated. It's hard to justify paying extra for a system whose graphics and underlying data are behind the times compared to the up-to-the-minute mobile device you probably carry with you already.

 

That said, in a nod to modern times, the Civic has a few useful tech amenities for smartphone users, including text messaging functionality, which allows you to listen to and respond to text messages while you drive (provided your phone supports this functionality), and Pandora radio functionality.

 

In the Honda Civic sedan, legroom and headroom for front passengers is competitive, while rear passengers benefit from more legroom than in rivals like the Chevrolet Cruze and the Ford Focus. The Civic offers 11.7 cubic feet of cargo capacity in the coupe and 12.5 cubic feet in the sedan, which means that the Cruze and Focus sedans have the advantage when it comes to trunk space. The hybrid models sacrifice trunk space to the battery pack, leaving 10.7 cubic feet. The large fuel tank needed for the Natural Gas model curtails trunk space even further.

 

Driving Impressions Leasing a Honda

 

The Honda Civic has long been one of the better-driving cars in its class, and the suspension and steering refinements seen in the 2013 model should make it even more appealing. The Civic offers one of the most comfortable and composed rides in the class, while its handling is reassuring. We also welcome the extra sound-deadening measures, as wind noise has been a problem with previous models.

 

Power from the 1.8-liter engine is merely adequate when fueled by gasoline, but its fuel efficiency and refined, Honda-typical character nevertheless make it a strong suit. One minor annoyance is the automatic transmission's propensity to upshift early (a concession that can make the Civic feel sluggish in traffic even as it promotes better gas mileage), and the lack of a dedicated manual-shift gate for drivers who want to take matters into their own hands. On the upside, the automatic shifts very smoothly, and if you're really bothered by the inability to select gears yourself, well, you can still get a manual transmission on the LX and Si models. As for the alternative fuel models, expect glacial acceleration with the Natural Gas and a far more refined driving experience from the Civic Hybrid than you'll find in Honda's Insight.

 

The 2013 Honda Civic Si is a fun car to drive. Refined suspension tuning, improved electric-assist power steering and additional torque at lower rpm give it a sharp attitude in and out of corners. However, it's outgunned by the competition in this class, as most rivals beat it in straight-line acceleration and handle as well or better when the road turns twisty.

 

Lease a Honda Civic Sedan

 

The 2013 Honda Civic proves that Honda is no slouch when it comes to acting on constructive criticism. The Civic was redesigned just last year, but the overhaul was panned as being too slight to give the car any real advantage in the very competitive compact car segment. This year, Honda responds by sprucing up the Civic with improvements that address the previous model's biggest flaws.

 

The most obvious changes are the styling upgrades, which give the car a sportier look that's also more distinctive compared to the previous-generation car. Inside the cabin, many of the cheap plastics that drew fire last year have been replaced with materials that boast a more high-end look and feel. The design is largely the same, though, meaning it lacks some of the visual pizzazz and sophistication of some rivals.

 

Also important to note in the cabin is the significantly expanded standard features list. Additional included amenities now include Bluetooth, a rearview camera, text message functionality, an iPod interface and Pandora functionality. Most of these items are often options on competitor vehicles as well.

 

There are mechanical revisions as well. Honda recalibrated the suspension and steering for more responsive handling, and added additional sound-deadening material for a quieter ride. On the Safety Honda Lease front, the new Civic benefits from an updated body structure that's said to provide better frontal impact protection, revised front-seat side airbags, and the addition of optional forward collision warning and lane departure warning systems for the Civic Hybrid model. These are also very rare items in this price range.

 

So the 2013 Honda Civic is now truly up to speed with its well-dressed and fully loaded rivals, which means the list of excellent choices in this segment just got a little bit longer. We'd still suggest looking at some of our other favorites, including the 2013 Ford Focus, 2013 Hyundai Elantra and Mazda 3, as they're competitive in terms of value, feature content and interior quality. Civic Hybrid shoppers will find the Toyota Prius C and Volkswagen Jetta Hybrid to be strong alternatives. And gearheads hankering for the Civic Si should test-drive the Ford Focus ST, Mazdaspeed 3 and Volkswagen GTI since they still have the edge in most performance categories.

 

Overall, however, we're impressed with the revitalized Honda Civic, and it's once again among the top choices for a small sedan or coupe.

 

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options Lease Honda

 

The 2013 Honda Civic is a compact car offered in coupe and sedan body styles.

 

The standard Civic coupe and sedan come in LX, midrange EX and top-of-the-line EX-L trims. The sedan is also available in a fuel-efficient HF trim.

 

Entry-level LX models come equipped with 15-inch steel wheels, full power accessories, air-conditioning, a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, a one-piece fold-down rear seatback and cruise control. Electronic features include a 5-inch central display screen, a rearview camera, Bluetooth phone and audio connectivity, SMS text messaging functionality and a four-speaker (six for the coupe) sound system with a CD player, an auxiliary audio jack, an iPod/USB audio interface and Pandora radio functionality.

 

The fuel-efficient HF sedan starts out with standard features similar to those of the LX sedan, then adds a few upgrades designed to deliver maximum mpg. These include low-rolling-resistance tires and aerodynamic cast-aluminum wheels, wind-cheating underbody panels and a rear spoiler.

 

The EX model adds to or supplants those features with 16-inch alloy wheels, rear disc brakes, a sunroof and 60/40 split-folding rear seatbacks. EX coupes get an upgraded seven-speaker sound system, while EX sedans step up to a six-speaker sound system. The EX-L model adds foglights, automatic headlights, heated mirrors, leather upholstery and heated front seats.

 

The Civic Natural Gas is available in one trim whose features largely mirror those of the LX.

 

The Civic Hybrid sedan is available in two trim levels, with the base model's list of standard features being similar to those of the mainstream EX sedan. The Hybrid also comes with forward collision warning and lane departure warning. The top-of-the-line "Leather" trim level for the Hybrid adds extras found on the regular EX-L.

 

The sporty Si coupe and sedan come in a single trim level that includes 17-inch alloy wheels, a bigger engine, a limited-slip front differential, a sport-tuned suspension, foglights and front and rear spoilers. Inside upgrades include most of the items from the EX model's standard features list plus front sport seats, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, an aluminum shift knob and red backlit gauges.

 

A navigation system with voice controls, satellite radio and real-time traffic updates is optional on all Si, Natural Gas and Hybrid models, and on EX and EX-L sedans and coupes.

 

Powertrains and Performance Honda Lease

 

The front-wheel-drive 2013 Honda Civic is powered by a 1.8-liter four-cylinder engine that puts out 140 horsepower and 128 pound-feet of torque. Transmission choices include a five-speed manual and an available five-speed automatic (HF and EX models get the automatic as standard equipment). With the automatic, the Civic returns an EPA-estimated 28 mpg city/39 mpg highway and 32 mpg combined. With the manual these numbers are slightly lower at 28/36/28, whereas they go up to 29/41/33 on the HF model. In Edmunds performance testing, a Civic EX went from zero to 60 mph in 9.3 seconds -- an average time for this segment.

 

The Civic Natural Gas features a version of the same 1.8-liter engine powered by, as its name suggests, natural gas. It produces only 110 hp and 106 lb-ft of torque, however. A five-speed automatic is standard. EPA-estimated fuel economy is the gasoline equivalent of 27/38/31 mpg.

 

The Civic Hybrid gets a 1.5-liter gasoline four-cylinder engine and an electric motor, a combination that's good for 110 hp and 127 lb-ft of torque. A continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT) is standard. In Edmunds testing, it hit 60 mph in 10.1 seconds -- on par with most economy hybrids. Not surprisingly, this powertrain is the most fuel-efficient of the bunch, with EPA numbers of 44/44/44.

 

The Civic Si's engine provides output of 201 hp and 170 lb-ft. A six-speed manual is the only transmission offered. EPA fuel economy estimates stand at 22/31/25. In Edmunds testing, an Si coupe hit 60 mph in 6.9 seconds, which is slower than average among sport compacts.

 

Safety Honda Lease

 

The 2013 Honda Civic comes with standard Safety Honda Lease features that include stability control, antilock brakes (four-wheel discs with the EX and Si), front side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags. Forward collision warning and lane departure warning systems are standard on the Civic Hybrid.

 

In Edmunds brake testing, a 2013 Civic EX came to a stop from 60 mph in a longish 130 feet. A 2012 Civic Hybrid was a bit better with a stop of 124 feet. At 120 feet, the 2012 Civic Si stopped the shortest for us, but this is still a disappointing distance considering the car was fitted with summer performance tires; other so-equipped sport compacts fared better.

 

The government updated its scores for the 2013 Civic coupe and sedan. The sedan received a perfect five stars overall, with four stars for frontal and five stars for side crash categories. The 2013 Civic coupe received four stars overall, also with four stars for frontal and five stars for side crash categories. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Honda Lease gave the 2013 Civic sedan and coupe the highest possible rating of "Good" in its frontal-offset, side and roof strength tests, as well as its highest "Top Safety Honda Lease Pick+" award.

 

Lease a Honda Interior Design and Special Features

 

Inside its cabin, the 2013 Honda Civic maintains its familiar two-tier dash display, which includes a 5-inch monitor that displays information for audio, hands-free phone use and various vehicle systems. Materials quality gets a noticeable upgrade this year, and anyone who bemoaned the cheap look and feel of the dash material, switchgear and door panels in last year's Civic will be glad to know that it has been replaced with more textured, premium-looking alternatives.

 

Most of the cabin's controls are well-placed, and the keypads and menu buttons on the steering wheel are intuitive enough for anyone who's spent time with a smartphone. But it's an overload of input sources; there can be up to 14 buttons and directional commands on the steering wheel alone, and the dash design with the optional navigation system looks quite busy. In addition, the nav system, although useful for finding addresses, is largely antiquated. It's hard to justify paying extra for a system whose graphics and underlying data are behind the times compared to the up-to-the-minute mobile device you probably carry with you already.

 

That said, in a nod to modern times, the Civic has a few useful tech amenities for smartphone users, including text messaging functionality, which allows you to listen to and respond to text messages while you drive (provided your phone supports this functionality), and Pandora radio functionality.

 

In the Honda Civic sedan, legroom and headroom for front passengers is competitive, while rear passengers benefit from more legroom than in rivals like the Chevrolet Cruze and the Ford Focus. The Civic offers 11.7 cubic feet of cargo capacity in the coupe and 12.5 cubic feet in the sedan, which means that the Cruze and Focus sedans have the advantage when it comes to trunk space. The hybrid models sacrifice trunk space to the battery pack, leaving 10.7 cubic feet. The large fuel tank needed for the Natural Gas model curtails trunk space even further.

 

Driving Impressions Leasing a Honda

 

The Honda Civic has long been one of the better-driving cars in its class, and the suspension and steering refinements seen in the 2013 model should make it even more appealing. The Civic offers one of the most comfortable and composed rides in the class, while its handling is reassuring. We also welcome the extra sound-deadening measures, as wind noise has been a problem with previous models.

 

Power from the 1.8-liter engine is merely adequate when fueled by gasoline, but its fuel efficiency and refined, Honda-typical character nevertheless make it a strong suit. One minor annoyance is the automatic transmission's propensity to upshift early (a concession that can make the Civic feel sluggish in traffic even as it promotes better gas mileage), and the lack of a dedicated manual-shift gate for drivers who want to take matters into their own hands. On the upside, the automatic shifts very smoothly, and if you're really bothered by the inability to select gears yourself, well, you can still get a manual transmission on the LX and Si models. As for the alternative fuel models, expect glacial acceleration with the Natural Gas and a far more refined driving experience from the Civic Hybrid than you'll find in Honda's Insight.

 

The 2013 Honda Civic Si is a fun car to drive. Refined suspension tuning, improved electric-assist power steering and additional torque at lower rpm give it a sharp attitude in and out of corners. However, it's outgunned by the competition in this class, as most rivals beat it in straight-line acceleration and handle as well or better when the road turns twisty.

 

Lease a Honda CR-V

 

Like the high-school class valedictorian who finds himself swimming in a sea of "A" students on his first day at an Ivy League college, it's easy for even the most impressive small crossover SUVs to get lost in the shuffle. Despite this challenging landscape, the 2013 Honda CR-V earns a well-deserved spot in the hearts of consumers. Much of its appeal is due to Honda's knack for giving most shoppers exactly what they want.

 

Compact crossovers are often the transportation of choice for those with small families. With ample passenger and cargo capacity and a full complement of family-friendly amenities, the 2013 CR-V is equipped to meet these responsibilities with a cheerful smile. Fuel economy is exceptional, while precise handling and intuitive controls ensure a thoroughly pleasant overall driver experience.

 

The 2013 CR-V's biggest shortcoming concerns what's under the hood. There's only one engine available, a 2.4-liter four-cylinder. It does provide that exceptional fuel economy, but if you're looking for an engine upgrade, you can't get one here. Also, a manual shift mode for the transmission isn't available, so those who enjoy interfacing with paddle shifters will find themselves out of luck.

 

One of the more impressive rivals faced by the Honda CR-V is the new Ford Escape, which comes to the table with a wider array of engine choices. Equally desirable are the feature-packed Hyundai Santa Fe Sport, the agile-handling Mazda CX-5 and the comfortable Chevrolet Equinox. Still, despite a campus thick with bright young talent, the CR-V is easily a well-rounded standout, especially for shoppers with family-oriented needs.

 

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options Lease Honda

 

The 2013 Honda CR-V is available in LX, EX and EX-L trim levels, and each can be equipped with front- or all-wheel drive.

 

The well-equipped LX comes standard with 16-inch steel wheels, automatic headlights, keyless entry, full power accessories, air-conditioning, cruise control, a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, driver-seat height adjustment, 60/40-split rear seats, a rearview camera, a 6-inch multi-information display, steering wheel audio controls, and Bluetooth phone and streaming audio. All LX models also have a four-speaker sound system with a CD player, a Pandora interface, an auxiliary audio jack and a USB/iPod interface.

 

EX models add 17-inch alloy wheels, foglights, a sunroof, rear privacy glass, a retractable cargo cover and six speakers for the sound system. Going with the EX-L gets you roof rails, heated side mirrors, dual-zone automatic climate control, an eight-way power driver seat with power lumbar, leather upholstery, heated front seats and an upgraded sound system with seven speakers and satellite radio. On top of this, the EX-L with Navigation adds a navigation system (with voice controls and real-time traffic), while the EX-L with Rear Entertainment System adds a rear entertainment system. Note that the nav system and rear DVD entertainment system can't be ordered together.

 

Powertrains and Performance Honda Lease

 

Every 2013 Honda CR-V comes with a 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine that produces 185 horsepower and 163 pound-feet of torque. A five-speed automatic and front-wheel drive are standard, while all-wheel drive is optional. The latter sends power to the front wheels exclusively until slippage is detected, at which point power is sent to the wheels with the most traction. In Edmunds performance testing, an EX-L with all-wheel drive went from zero to 60 mph in 9.4 seconds -- a tad slow for a four-cylinder small crossover SUV.

 

EPA estimates for the front-drive model are an estimated 23 mpg city/31 mpg highway and 26 mpg combined. AWD CR-Vs drop slightly to 22/30/25. These ratings make it one of the most fuel-efficient choices in its segment.

 

Safety Honda Lease

 

Standard Safety Honda Lease equipment on the 2013 Honda CR-V includes antilock disc brakes, stability and traction control, active front head restraints, front side airbags and side curtain airbags. All CR-V models also come with a back-up camera.

 

In Edmunds brake testing, a CR-V EX-L came to a stop from 60 mph in 120 feet -- a short distance for a vehicle in this segment.

 

The 2013 CR-V earned a perfect five stars for overall protection in government crash tests, scoring five stars for both frontal- and side-impact protection. In testing by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Honda Lease, the CR-V received the best possible rating of "Good" in the frontal-offset, side impact and roof strength tests.

 

Lease a Honda Interior Design and Special Features

 

The cabin of the 2013 CR-V boasts fluid, organic lines and ample nooks and crannies for stowing carry-on items. A logical layout makes controls easy to find and the overall aesthetic is pleasing to the eye. The open space between the front seats seen in the previous generation's sub-EX-L models has been retired, and all 2013 CR-Vs feature a full front console that increases utility by providing a bevy of additional storage compartments.

 

The sliding rear seats seen in the previous-generation CR-V are no more, but they've been discontinued to make way for an amenity that's perhaps even more useful: a spring-loaded auto-fold feature that allows you to fold the rear seats almost flat by gently pulling on a lever. The current seat offers just as much legroom as the sliding seat did, since its new fixed position mirrors the one held by the sliding seat when moved all the way back.

 

Abundant tech features are available, with a Pandora interface and Bluetooth phone and streaming audio being offered as standard equipment on all models. The CR-V is also available with an SMS text messaging function that allows you to listen to incoming text messages via the audio system and reply with one of six preset responses.

 

The CR-V also swallows more stuff than its outside appearance would suggest. With the rear seats in place, the CR-V can carry 37.2 cubic feet of cargo; fold the rear seat down and that figure grows to an impressive 70.9 cubic feet.

 

Driving Impressions Leasing a Honda

 

While its performance relative to that of other four-cylinder-powered crossovers is competitive enough, there's no denying that the CR-V is a bit lacking in low-end power. This makes the absence of a V6 or turbocharged four-cylinder upgrade all the more apparent. Still, the CR-V's mill returns very good fuel economy, and while its five-speed automatic is a little behind the times (just about every other competitor has a six-speed auto), it shifts smoothly and responds decently enough to throttle inputs.

 

Although a few other small crossovers are more enjoyable to drive overall, the CR-V offers precise steering and commendably steady handling. Ride quality on most surfaces is acceptably smooth, and unlike the previous generation, the 2013 Honda CR-V also boasts a relatively quiet cabin. Overall, the feeling is one of refinement.

 

 

Lease a Honda Crosstour

 

More a large fastback-roofed hatchback than a true crossover, the 2013 Honda Crosstour offers a few perks over the related Accord sedan. There are about 10 more cubic feet of seats-up cargo capacity, and it's easily accessed thanks to that hatchback design. There's also the availability of all-wheel drive and handling that's more carlike than the typical crossover's.

 

This year's Crosstour also features a number of improvements, including a more powerful V6 engine paired to a new six-speed automatic transmission, available keyless ignition/entry and newly available driver aids such as blind-spot display and lane-departure/forward collision warning. Additionally, front and rear end styling has been revised for a more rugged look.

 

But the reality is that we still think there's more to be gained from some of the Crosstour's more practical wagon- and SUV-style crossover competitors. Models such as the 2013 Chevrolet Equinox or 2013 Nissan Murano provide considerably greater (and more easily accessed) cargo space thanks to their more functional, boxy shapes and still drive quite competently. We also like the more wagonlike 2013 Toyota Venza if for nothing else than its more graceful styling. But if you have a soft spot for Hondas and want something between a sedan and crossover, the Crosstour should be a satisfying choice.

 

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options Lease Honda

 

The 2013 Honda Crosstour hatchback is available in EX and EX-L trim levels.

 

The EX comes standard with 17-inch alloy wheels, automatic headlights, foglamps, a sunroof, keyless entry, eight-way power driver seat, a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, automatic air-conditioning, a 60/40-split-folding rear seatback, a rearview camera (with its monitor embedded in the rearview mirror), Bluetooth and a seven-speaker sound system with a six-CD changer, auxiliary audio jack and an iPod/USB audio interface. The EX V6 adds 18-inch wheels, keyless ignition/entry, an 8-inch monitor for the rearview camera, a blind-spot monitor, dual-zone automatic climate control, a four-way power passenger seat, Bluetooth streaming audio and an upgraded sound system with Pandora radio.

 

The EX-L includes the EX V6 features (less the 18-inch wheels and keyless ignition/entry) and adds leather upholstery, heated front seats, driver seat memory functions, a cargo cover, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a hidden removable utility box and satellite radio. The EX-L V6 further adds the 18-inch wheels and keyless ignition/entry. The sole option for the EX-L is a voice-activated navigation system.

 

Powertrains and Performance Honda Lease

 

The 2013 Honda Crosstour offers a choice of two engines. One is a 2.4-liter four-cylinder that produces 192 horsepower and 162 pound-feet of torque. The other is a 3.5-liter V6 rated at 278 hp and 252 lb-ft of torque. A five-speed automatic is standard on the four while a six-speed automatic with paddle shifters comes with the V6. Front-wheel drive is standard, with all-wheel drive available on the EX-L V6.

 

In Edmunds performance testing, a previous V6/five-speed automatic front-wheel-drive Crosstour accelerated from zero to 60 mph in a class-competitive 7.5 seconds. We'd expect the current, slightly more powerful V6 with the six-speed to be a few tenths quicker.

 

The EPA fuel economy estimates range from 22 mpg city/31 mpg highway and 25 mpg in combined driving for a four-cylinder, front-wheel-drive version down to a still respectable 19/28/22 for a V6 with all-wheel drive.

 

Safety Honda Lease

 

Standard Safety Honda Lease features for all 2013 Honda Crosstours include active front-seat head restraints, antilock disc brakes, stability and traction control, front-seat side airbags and side curtain airbags. The EX-L models add forward collision warning, blind-spot monitoring and lane-departure warning systems.

 

In Edmunds brake testing, the Crosstour V6 stopped from 60 mph in 131 feet, a slightly long distance for this class of vehicle.

 

The Insurance Institute of Highway Safety Honda Lease gave the 2013 Crosstour the best possible rating of "Good" for frontal-offset, side-impact and roof-strength crash protection.

 

Lease a Honda Interior Design and Special Features

 

When it comes to the look of its cabin, the 2013 Honda Crosstour is a dead ringer for the previous-generation Accord sedan on which it is based. This means that the center stack is crowded with a plethora of buttons -- opting for the navigation system only adds to the button overload. Fortunately, the combination of a high-mounted screen, voice activation and a multipurpose control knob serves to simplify operation of the many systems.

 

The Crosstour offers a roomy cabin, with respectable head- and legroom in the front and rear seats. The seats themselves are comfortable and supportive, though some may find the lumbar support too aggressive.

 

Compared to an Accord sedan, the Crosstour is indeed more versatile, with the hatchback allowing one to load bulky items easily. However, there are only 25.7 cubic feet of storage space behind the rear seats and 51.3 cubes with them folded. Intrusive wells for the rear wheels further impede usefulness. More traditional wagons and crossovers can accommodate quite a bit more.

 

Driving Impressions Leasing a Honda

 

As far as driving dynamics is concerned, the 2013 Honda Crosstour shares some of the Accord's strengths -- such as accurate steering and predictable handling -- but with up to 300 pounds of extra curb weight and a higher center of gravity, the Crosstour is a much less sporting choice than the sedan. We've yet to test the Crosstour with the four-cylinder engine, but performance with the V6 is more than adequate. On the highway, the Crosstour performs admirably, providing a comfortable ride quality and a quiet cabin at speed.

Lease a Honda Pilot

 

The midsize crossover segment is riddled with choices, many of them newer and better performing than the 2013 Honda Pilot. But as per Honda's usual approach, the Pilot's overall package makes it worthy of consideration.

 

For starters, the Pilot's interior is huge, befitting the minivan alternative that midsize crossovers have become for many. Its surprisingly spacious third-row seating makes it possible for as many as eight occupants to travel in comfort. Performance from the Pilot's V6 is sluggish and the five-speed automatic transmission is definitely a step behind just about everybody. On the upside, the Pilot's fuel economy is at the top of the class. A similar trade-off is at work for the 2013 Pilot's soft handling: For putting up with sleepy responses, you get a supremely cushioned ride.

 

We also like the 2013 Pilot's utility. The crossover's boxy sheet metal isn't likely to set many (or any) hearts aflame, but the high roof line means backseaters have plenty of headroom. And with the rear seats dropped, those mammoth Costco and Home Depot loads are sucked in with ease. Up front, the Pilot gives you two perfectly positioned cupholders and enough storage spots to handle just about anything else you throw its way. Short of a minivan, there aren't many utility vehicles that can easily swallow as much cargo and people as the 2013 Pilot.

 

That said, there are other choices out there. The Pilot's interior quality is still disappointing. One need look no further than to the 2013 Hyundai Santa Fe or 2013 Nissan Pathfinder to find markedly more appealing interior treatments. And if more engaging performance is your thing, the Ford Flex or 2013 Mazda CX-9 would certainly be better choices. Overall, though, the formidable blend of utility and efficiency -- not to mention Honda's top-notch reliability reputation -- virtually demand that buyers take a look at what the 2013 Honda Pilot brings to the party.

 

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options Lease Honda

 

The 2013 Honda Pilot is a midsize crossover sold in four trim levels: LX, EX, EX-L and Touring.

 

The 2013 Pilot's base LX trim comes standard with 17-inch steel wheels, automatic headlights, full power accessories, cruise control, a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, tri-zone automatic climate control, 60/40-split second- and third-row seats, an 8-inch center display screen, Bluetooth phone and audio connectivity, a rearview camera and a seven-speaker sound system with a CD player, a USB/iPod interface and an auxiliary audio jack.

 

The Pilot EX adds 18-inch alloy wheels, foglights, heated mirrors (AWD models) and an eight-way power driver seat (with two-way power lumbar adjustment).

 

Moving to the Pilot EX-L brings leather upholstery, a sunroof, a power liftgate, heated front seats, a power passenger seat, an auto-dimming rearview mirror and satellite radio. Two optional features are available when purchasing the EX-L: a rear-seat entertainment system and a voice-activated navigation system.

 

Both the EX-L's optional features are included on the high-end Touring model, which further adds roof rails, parking sensors, driver seat memory functions and a 10-speaker premium sound system.

 

Powertrains and Performance Honda Lease

 

Regardless of trim level, all 2013 Pilot models use the same powertrain: a 3.5-liter V6 that makes 250 horsepower and 253 pound-feet of torque, channeling its power to a five-speed automatic transmission. Front-wheel drive is standard, but any Pilot can be ordered with an all-wheel-drive system that automatically shifts as much as 70 percent of power to the rear wheels if the front tires begin to slip. A driver-selectable "lock" feature routes maximum torque to the rear wheels in 1st or 2nd gear at low speeds to help free a stuck Pilot.

 

Edmunds performance testing saw an all-wheel-drive Pilot Touring accelerate from a standstill to 60 mph in 8.9 seconds, while a front-wheel-drive model did it in 8.3. Both are a bit slower than average. The Pilot's EPA-estimated economy of 18 mpg city/25 highway and 21 mpg combined for front-drive models and 17/24/20 for AWD variants puts the Pilot in the top portion of its segment. The front-drive Pilot can tow 2,000 pounds and the all-wheel-drive models can tow 4,500 pounds.

 

Safety Honda Lease

 

The 2013 Honda Pilot's standard Safety Honda Lease features include antilock brakes, stability control, front-seat side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags. In Edmunds brake testing, the Pilot came to a stop from 60 mph in 130 feet. This is below average for midsize crossovers but actually an improvement over the braking performance of earlier Pilots.

 

In crash tests conducted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Honda Lease Administration, the Pilot earned an overall rating of four stars out of a possible five, with four stars for frontal crash protection and five stars for side-impact crashes. In Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Honda Lease tests, the Pilot earned the top "Good" rating for frontal-offset, side-impact and roof strength tests.

 

Lease a Honda Interior Design and Special Features

 

Apart from the generally downmarket appearance of some of the more prominent cabin trim, the 2013 Pilot has a useful interior with thoughtful details and clearly presented instrumentation. The standard automatic climate control helps reduce the number of buttons and knobs on the center stack, as does the new 8-inch information screen for all trims. Too bad some of the remaining buttons and knobs still have a chintzy feel and appearance.

 

Unlike some other three-row crossovers, the Pilot's aft-most row is an area with genuinely acceptable room for adults. Unfortunately, the seat cushions for the second and third rows are too low, forcing longer-legged passengers into more of a squatting, knees-up position. The Chevy Traverse and Ford Flex are much more comfortable in this regard.

 

With the second- and third-row seats stowed, the 2013 Honda Pilot can hold up to 87 cubic feet of cargo. This figure is technically less than some rivals, but the Pilot's boxy shape works to its advantage, allowing it to more easily accept bulkier items with ease. For smaller items, there are plenty of thoughtful storage bins and pockets throughout the cabin.

 

Driving Impressions Leasing a Honda

 

The overall driving impression of the 2013 Pilot is of a heavy and large vehicle, more so than perhaps it should be. On paper, the Pilot's 250-hp V6 should be enough, but it never feels like it is; some of the performance deficit may come from the behind-the-times five-speed automatic, and some can be chalked up to the Pilot's heft.

 

Overall agility is also in short supply. Around corners and in tight spaces, the Pilot feels rather cumbersome due to its slow steering and boxy dimensions. But more generally, the 2013 Pilot is still pleasant to drive, with a cushy ride that readily soaks up ruts and bumps.

 

 

Lease a Honda Ridgeline

 

If you're using a pickup for a trade or serious towing, then a conventional pickup still is the way to go. But if you only occasionally require the utility of a pickup, the 2013 Honda Ridgeline is worth considering.

 

There are plenty of full-size pickups with beds barely longer than the 2013 Honda Ridgeline's 5-foot box and with the same 50-inch width, so the Ridgeline's no less capable as a cargo hauler than many run-of-the-mill crew cab battlewagons. At the same time, it gives you a much more manageable footprint. And while you still enjoy a high-set seating position and admirable ground clearance, the Ridgeline's fully independent suspension and lighter, car-based structure make it more nimble than most conventional pickups.

 

Honda keeps the Ridgeline simple with a single four-door body style, one engine and an all-wheel-drive system for all models. The 2013 Ridgeline's cabin is wide and spacious and loaded with versatility for cargo and passengers. But for the higher driving position, you could be in any number of Honda's cars or crossovers -- if they also had the bed out back, handy in-floor storage locker and a tailgate that swings or drops down traditional-pickup style.

 

The Ridgeline has some notable drawbacks, though. Its lighter-duty suspension and structure makes it more of an urban hauler that gets you through difficult weather or mild off-pavement excursions than a true off-roader. The Ridgeline's V6 power also falls short of the V8s or turbocharged V6s in full-size domestic pickups, and its fuel economy isn't so great, either.

 

If you need a pickup but can't sacrifice standard pickup toughness, stick with similar-sized conventional pickups such as the Nissan Frontier or 2013 Toyota Tacoma. Both offer more body styles and heavier-duty undercarriages. But the Ridgeline and its all-around versatility might be best thought of as an alternative to midsize crossovers useful in so many suburban households.

 

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options Lease Honda

 

The 2013 Honda Ridgeline is a five-passenger midsize pickup truck offered in a single four-door crew cab body style with four available trim levels: RT, Sport, RTS and top-of-the-line RTL.

 

The entry-level RT is well-equipped with standard features including 17-inch steel wheels, a power-sliding rear window, air-conditioning, a 60/40-split-folding rear seat (with under-seat storage), a rearview camera, full power accessories, cruise control, a trip computer and a six-speaker sound system with a CD player.

 

The Sport adds 18-inch alloy wheels, rear privacy glass, foglights, special exterior trim, a leather-wrapped steering wheel and an auxiliary audio jack.

 

To the RT's features list, the RTS adds 17-inch alloy wheels, rear privacy glass, dual-zone automatic climate control, an eight-way power driver seat and an upgraded seven-speaker audio system with a six-CD changer. The top-level RTL gets 18-inch alloy wheels, foglights, a sunroof, leather upholstery, ambient console lighting, heated front seats, a 115-volt AC power outlet and satellite radio.

 

The Ridgeline's factory options list is limited to a navigation system with Bluetooth, and is only available for the RTL.

 

Powertrains and Performance Honda Lease

 

The 2013 Honda Ridgeline offers only a 3.5-liter V6 generating 250 horsepower and 247 pound-feet of torque. Power flows through a five-speed automatic transmission and a standard all-wheel-drive system, although in normal driving power is sent almost exclusively to the front wheels. The system can be locked in all-wheel-drive mode at speeds up to 18 mph. In Edmunds testing, the Ridgeline accelerated from zero to 60 mph in 8.3 seconds, a little slower than most competing trucks.

 

EPA estimated fuel economy is 15 mpg city/21 mpg highway and 17 mpg combined -- mediocre considering the Ridgeline V6's modest power and performance. Some full-size traditional pickups with more powerful V6s are rated better. On the bright side, the Ridgeline can tow up to 5,000 pounds, a limit similar to some V6-powered full-size pickups. The Ridgeline's payload and towing capacity is less than many V6 midsize pickups equipped with trailer-tow packages, however.

 

Safety Honda Lease

 

Every Ridgeline comes standard with antilock brakes, stability control, front seat side airbags, side curtain airbags (with rollover sensor) and front seat active head restraints.

 

In Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Honda Lease tests, the Ridgeline received the organization's highest "Good" rating in frontal-offset and side-impact crashes, as well as for roof-strength testing. In Edmunds testing, the Ridgeline required 133 feet to stop from 60 mph, a little long for a midsize pickup.

 

Lease a Honda Interior Design and Special Features

 

The 2013 Honda Ridgeline's cabin is wide, as are its seats, and entry into the front or rear seats is easy, something we can't always say about the rear seat of conventional midsize pickups. The gauges are large and easy to read, and major and secondary controls are operated by large stalks and knobs suitable for gloved hands. Secondary controls for the audio and climate-control systems are simple and functional, perhaps reflecting the overall age of the Ridgeline's interior design. Another tipoff to the relative age of the truck's infotainment architecture: Bluetooth hands-free phone control, often standard on even the most modest of new models, is optional. And even then, you'll have to first buy the RTL trim level to get it.

 

But the Ridgeline's car-type structure lends a more comfortable and nicely trimmed interior than you'll find on most competing pickups. Handy and capacious storage spaces and cupholders abound. The 60/40-split rear seat folds to make room for large items that won't fit in the bed's 8.5-cubic-foot lockable stowage area, although it is capable of holding a bag or two of golf clubs. The lockable trunk's drain plugs allow for all manner of potentially sloppy uses, but anything in there might have to be removed if you need access to the spare tire under the bed floor.

 

Driving Impressions Leasing a Honda

 

The 2013 Ridgeline's carlike independent suspension delivers a smooth and quiet ride compared to conventional pickups and handling is more responsive, too. The Ridgeline's 3.5-liter V6's output is sufficient, but the truck's excessive weight, coupled with an automatic transmission with just five gears, means disappointing fuel economy for a truck that should have more of an advantage in its class.