Lease a MINI Cooper Clubman

Take a regular Mini Cooper but give it more interior space. That's the basic premise of the 2013 Mini Cooper Clubman. Measuring about 9 inches longer than the standard Mini Cooper, the Clubman benefits from about 50 percent more cargo capacity and a bit more rear-seat legroom. Fortunately, the added dimensions have little effect on the overall driving enjoyment we've come to expect from Minis.

 

That fun-to-drive character does, however, come with its own shortcomings. The Clubman's ride quality is stiffer than that of most of its rivals, and this can be tiresome on long trips. Also carrying over from the regular Mini is a noticeable amount of road and wind noise that intrudes into the cabin. These trade-offs will likely not be deal breakers for most drivers, though, especially for those who value sporty driving dynamics.

 

Still, there are a few competing hatchbacks one should consider alongside the Clubman. A more radical interpretation of the traditional hatchback can be found in the 2013 Hyundai Veloster, which has a regular-style third door on its passenger side that allows it to be a more viable choice than the Clubman if you're often bringing along rear seat passengers. The 2013 Ford Focus (from the base model to the sporty ST) is also worth considering, on the strength of its sharp handling and welcoming interior. For character and personalization, though, the 2013 Mini Clubman remains in a class of its own.

 

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options MINI Cooper Clubman Lease

 

The 2013 Mini Cooper Clubman is a four-passenger, two-door hatchback with a reverse-opening rear "club" door on the passenger side. In back, a pair of barn-style doors swing outward, replacing the liftgate of the standard Mini hatchback. The Clubman is available in three trim levels: Cooper, sportier Cooper S and high-performance John Cooper Works.

 

The base Cooper comes standard with 15-inch alloy wheels, full power accessories, air-conditioning, cruise control, leatherette upholstery, keyless entry, multicolor ambient lighting, a tilt-and-telescoping leather-wrapped multifunction steering wheel, Bluetooth, a trip computer and a six-speaker stereo with a CD player, HD and an auxiliary audio jack.

 

The Cooper S adds a more powerful turbocharged engine, 16-inch wheels, run-flat tires, foglights, dual exhausts, firmer suspension tuning, sport seats and alloy pedals. Stepping up to the John Cooper Works gets you even more power, 17-inch wheels, Brembo brakes and cloth upholstery. A limited-slip differential and a firmer suspension can be fitted to both the S and John Cooper Works.

 

Clubman options are plentiful and arranged in several packages, and most are available separately. Highlight features include adaptive xenon headlamps, a dual-pane sunroof, automatic climate control, heated front seats, keyless ignition/entry, a 10-speaker Harman Kardon surround-sound audio system, satellite radio and an iPod interface. Other options include about a dozen different wheel choices, rear parking sensors, cloth or leather upholstery, a navigation system, smartphone app integration and multiple combinations of interior trim and materials. A multitude of dealer-installed features are also available.

 

Powertrains and Performance Leasing MINI Cooper Clubman

 

The base Cooper Clubman is powered by a 1.6-liter four-cylinder that produces 121 horsepower and 114 pound-feet of torque. The Cooper S raises the ante with a turbocharged version of the base Cooper engine that generates 181 hp and 177 lb-ft of torque (192 lb-ft at full throttle thanks to an overboost function). The John Cooper Works pulls 208 hp and 192 lb-ft of torque (207 lb-ft with overboost) from a revised version of the same engine. All Clubmans come standard with a six-speed manual transmission, and a six-speed automatic with manual shift control is optional.

 

Mini estimates the base Clubman with a manual transmission can go from zero to 60 mph in 8.9 seconds (10.2 seconds for the automatic). The Clubman S needs just 6.8 seconds (7.1 for the automatic) for the same trip, and the JCW with the manual shaves that time further to just 6.5 seconds. Surprisingly, the impressive acceleration doesn't horribly impact fuel economy. With either transmission, the base Clubman achieves EPA-estimated fuel economy of 27 mpg city/35 mpg highway and 30 mpg combined. The S is rated at 27/35/30 mpg for the manual and 26/34/29 for the automatic, while the manual John Cooper Works version returns 26/35/29 and 26/34/29 for the automatic.

 

Lease a MINI Cooper Clubman Safety

 

The 2013 Mini Cooper Clubman comes standard with antilock disc brakes, front-seat side airbags, full-length side curtain airbags and stability control. In Edmunds brake testing, the Clubman S came to a stop from 60 mph in a short 112 feet.

 

Interior Design and Special Features MINI Cooper Clubman Lease

 

The Mini Clubman's biggest advantage over the standard Cooper is in rear-seat legroom; that is, the Clubman actually has some, an additional 2.5 inches, in fact. But for full-size (and larger) adults, it's still pretty cramped back there. Fortunately, the Clubman's passenger side access door eases the effort of climbing in and out of the backseat.

 

Mini's optional Mini Connected infotainment feature offers smartphone integration using a 6.5-inch display located in the center of the car's speedometer. Downloading a free app onto your smartphone allows easy access to Facebook, Twitter and a slew of Internet radio stations, including Pandora. Additionally, Mini Connected includes Google search and send-to-car functionality.

 

The Clubman's cargo area is more than twice as large as the regular Cooper's, although with just 9.2 cubic feet of capacity, it's not exactly cavernous. Flip the rear seats down, however, and the cargo bay expands to a useful 32.8 cubes.

 

As in the regular Cooper, the Clubman features the retro-inspired control setup, punctuated with toggle switches and anchored by an oversized speedometer in the center stack. Some will love the unique style of form trumping function, but others may find it annoying and pretentious.

 

Lease a MINI Cooper Clubman Driving Impressions

 

Although longer than the regular Mini, the 2013 Mini Cooper Clubman still entertains with its road manners. Driver inputs generate immediate results and there's plenty of feedback through the seats, steering wheel and pedals, while the electric-assist power steering makes maneuvering at slow speeds effortless. Hitting the Sport button -- standard on every Clubman -- firms up the steering effort and quickens throttle response. For some, though, the stiff suspension on the John Cooper Works model, or the optional sport suspension on the Cooper S, might be too aggressive for comfort.

 

In addition to the Clubman's quick handling, engine power is surprisingly zippy, even for the base 1.6-liter four-cylinder. The power is just right, and the engine feels responsive whether you choose the six-speed manual transmission or the six-speed automatic. The Cooper S and John Cooper Works models will please drivers seeking speedier thrills, with the turbo providing a generous helping of acceleration with barely a hint of lag. Regardless of which Clubman you choose, all offer an invigorating drive.

 

Lease a MINI Cooper Roadster

If you're seeking road-going charm, it's hard to beat a Mini. These playful and nostalgic vehicles can certainly fulfill the desire for some drivers to express themselves, but like anything else, there are some drawbacks to keep in mind.

 

In the case of the 2013 Mini Cooper Roadster, the flaws may seem a bit more prominent than with the standard Mini Convertible on which it is based. One major difference is the Roadster's convertible top, which lacks an inner liner and leaves the roof's internals exposed to occupants. Some may be able to get past this lack of refinement, but will likely have a harder time ignoring the increased amount of wind and road noise that intrudes into the cabin. At least this year, Mini saw fit to equip all roadsters with a standard power top and wind deflector (both were much-needed options last year).

 

On the bright side, the 2013 Mini Cooper Roadster manages to benefit from a few of its differences, too. The raked-back styling and lower stance certainly add a sporty flair compared to the more upright Mini Convertible. Furthermore, with the absence of the Convertible's generally useless rear seats, the Roadster instead benefits from a larger cargo hold. Out on the open road, the Mini Cooper Roadster behaves just as you'd expect from other Minis. It's immensely fun to pilot, particularly in the Cooper S and John Cooper Works trims.

 

For those contemplating any two-seat convertible, it's quite possible that the aforementioned shortcomings are easily forgiven. That said, there are a few alternatives that could be considered. Retro-themed open-air driving can also be found in the 2013 Volkswagen Beetle Convertible, while the 2013 Fiat 500 Convertible has an Italian charm all its own and is reasonably fun to drive. The 2013 Mazda Miata is still a benchmark for driving excitement on a budget, even if it is ubiquitous nowadays.

 

The 2013 Mini Cooper Roadster is anything but bland, but the only question for you is, "At what point does charm outweigh its flaws?"

 

MINI Lease Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

 

The 2013 Mini Cooper Roadster is a two-door, two-passenger convertible that is offered in three trim levels: Base, S and John Cooper Works (JCW).

 

Standard features for the base Mini Roadster include 16-inch alloy wheels, a power-assist convertible top, a wind deflector, full power accessories, cruise control, remote keyless entry, leatherette (vinyl) upholstery, air-conditioning, a leather-wrapped tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, six-way manually adjustable seats, a trip computer, interior ambient lighting and a six-speaker sound system with a CD player, iPod/USB connectivity and an auxiliary audio jack.

 

Stepping up to the Cooper S Roadster adds a turbocharged engine, a hood scoop, foglights, firmer suspension tuning, sport seats and alloy pedals. The performance-focused JCW upgrades include a more powerful turbo engine, 17-inch wheels, upgraded suspension components and tuning, sport-tuned traction control, Brembo brakes, an aerodynamic body kit, cloth upholstery and piano-black interior trim.

 

Bundled options include a Cold Weather package (power-folding and heated mirrors, heated seats and headlight washers), a Premium package (keyless ignition/entry, automatic headlights and wipers, chrome interior accents, an auto-dimming rearview mirror and automatic climate control) a Technology package (center armrest, rear parking sensors, a premium Harman Kardon surround-sound system and Mini Connected smartphone integration) and a Sport package for the base trim (17-inch wheels, hood stripes, foglights, sport seats and dynamic traction control). The Sport package on the Cooper S also includes xenon headlights.

 

Many of the packaged features are also offered as stand-alone options, along with a variety of 16- and 17-inch wheel designs, adaptive headlights, a sport suspension, Recaro sport seats, cloth upholstery, lumbar seat adjustments and satellite radio. As with all Mini vehicles, buyers can choose from a seemingly limitless combination of colors and graphics, while the Mini Yours program allows for additional customization with exclusive exterior colors, upholstery and interior surfaces.

 

MINI Leasing Powertrains and Performance

 

Powering the 2013 Mini Roadster is a 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine that produces 121 horsepower and 114 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed manual with hill-start assist is standard and a six-speed automatic with shift paddles is optional. Mini estimates a manual-equipped Roadster will go from zero to 60 mph in 8.7 seconds (10 seconds with the automatic). EPA-estimated fuel economy is 27 mpg city/35 mpg highway and 30 mpg combined for both the manual and automatic.

 

The Cooper S Roadster has a turbocharged version of the same engine, increasing output to 181 hp and 177 lb-ft of torque (192 lb-ft at full throttle thanks to an overboost function). Mini estimates 0-60-mph acceleration in 6.7 seconds for the manual and 6.9 seconds for the automatic. Estimated fuel economy is still excellent at 26/35/29 with the manual and 26/34/29 with the auto.

 

Thanks to increased turbo boost, the John Cooper Works churns out 208 hp and 192 lb-ft of torque. Despite the added power output, fuel economy estimates are identical to the Cooper S Roadster. In Edmunds performance testing, a Roadster JCW with the manual transmission went from zero to 60 mph in 6.4 seconds.

 

MINI Lease Safety

 

Standard safety features for all 2013 Mini Roadsters include antilock disc brakes, stability control, traction control, seat-mounted side airbags and rollover protection bars. Parking sensors are optional.

 

In Edmunds brake testing, a John Cooper Works Roadster stopped from 60 mph in 115 feet, which is what you'd expect from a roadster with summer tires.

 

Interior Design and Special Features Leasing a MINI

 

As expected, the interior of the Roadster is done up with typical Mini flair, including the infamous toggle switches, giant speedometer and body-colored panels. They're all nice nods to the original Mini, but in terms of practicality, it comes off as a bit gimmicky.

 

Unlike the four-seat Mini Cooper convertible, the Roadster takes a more frugal approach and, as a result, suffers from a distinct lack of refinement. The Roadster's single-layer folding fabric top (as opposed to the Convertible's twin-layer) lets quite a bit of road and wind noise into the cabin and leaves the top's mechanicals exposed to the occupants.

 

One of our biggest complaints about last year's Roadster was the fussy manually operated top and non-standard wind deflector. This year, Mini has addressed these problems by including both as standard features. With the top up, however, rear visibility is notably poor, making the available rear parking sensors a sensible add-on.

 

The Roadster does manage to improve upon the Convertible in one area: cargo capacity. Featuring a more conventional trunk lid instead of the Convertible's odd tailgate-style opening, the Roadster can hold up to 8.5 cubic feet (the Convertible tops out at 6 cubes).

 

Lease a MINI Driving Impressions

 

Reactions to the 2013 Mini Roadster have been mixed, but it's worth noting that the split occurs down trim level lines. Most of the criticism levied at the Roadster and Roadster S stems from a lack of distinction from the standard convertible in terms of performance, and a ride quality that can be considered too harsh for some. To its credit, every Mini's mission, regardless of model/trim is to provide a uniquely sporty driving experience, and the Mini Roadster fulfills that promise. The car's electric-assist power steering is as good as any manufacturer has developed, with crisp reactions and laserlike precision.

 

Overall, the base 2013 Mini Cooper Roadster will likely satisfy most drivers, with the S trim adding a little more thrill with its turbocharged engine. Opting for the 208-hp John Cooper Works is a commitment best left to the most spirited drivers only.

 

Lease a MINI Cooper Paceman

Mini has expanded its lineup yet again, and the 2013 Mini Cooper Paceman represents its most spacious coupe offering to date. The all-new Paceman is fundamentally a two-door version of the Mini Countryman. This tall hatchback/crossover is meant to capture the hearts and minds of consumers who feel that a regular hardtop Cooper or Clubman is too small or that the Countryman is too SUV-ish.

 

Mechanically, the Countryman and the Paceman are very similar, though the Paceman is the sportier of the two models. It rides a bit closer to the ground, for example, and there are subtle styling differences, including a lower roof line, a more raked tailgate, swollen rear quarter panels and blacked-out roof pillars, all of which give it a tougher look. Although the 2013 Mini Paceman isn't as nimble as the regular Cooper, it's still very fun to drive, with quick steering and brisk acceleration when equipped with either of the turbocharged engines. You can also get it with all-wheel drive, something that isn't offered on smaller Coopers. Of course, Mini offers a wide range of customization possibilities for it as well.

 

Unfortunately, the 2013 Mini Paceman suffers from many of the downsides that affect the Countryman, including slow acceleration with the base engine and a price that rises to luxury-brand levels when tempting, big-ticket options are added. You should also keep in mind that unlike the Countryman, the Mini Paceman doesn't have a rear bench seat option, so seating capacity tops out at four.

 

It's safe to say that you'll find cheaper and more practical transportation in the form of traditional crossovers like the 2014 Mazda CX-5 or performance hatchbacks like the 2013 Ford Focus ST or 2013 Volkswagen GTI and Golf R. On the high end, you could get into a more prestigious BMW X1 for about what it costs for a loaded Paceman.

 

Then again, none of those vehicles can match the 2013 Mini Paceman's style and personality. If you truly want a big Mini Cooper hatchback, or you just like the idea of a crossover with only two doors, we can still recommend the new Paceman.

 

MINI Lease Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

 

The 2013 Mini Cooper Paceman is a compact two-door hatchback, though its tall ride height also gives it the appearance of a small crossover SUV. It's available in base, S and John Cooper Works (JCW) trim levels.

 

The base Paceman comes standard with 17-inch alloy wheels, air-conditioning, full power accessories, front sport seats, leatherette (premium vinyl) upholstery, a leather-wrapped tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, cruise control, Bluetooth connectivity, and a six-speaker sound system with a CD player, HD radio and USB/iPod auxiliary audio jacks.

 

The Paceman S adds a turbocharged engine, foglights, sport seats and a dynamic traction mode for the stability control system. Other than the turbocharged engine, all of these items are available as options on the base model.

 

The John Cooper Works has a more powerful version of the turbocharged engine, 18-inch wheels, a sport-tuned suspension, a sport exhaust system and special interior styling details.

 

Options are plentiful for all varieties of the 2013 Mini Paceman. Available exterior and mechanical upgrades include 17-, 18- and 19-inch wheels, adaptive xenon headlights, a sport-tuned suspension (for the base and S trim levels), rear parking sensors, a panoramic sunroof, rain-sensing wipers, chrome exterior accents and roof rails. Inside, the Paceman can be ordered with automatic climate control, heated front seats, leather upholstery, satellite radio and a 10-speaker Harman Kardon audio system. Another option, the Mini Connected interface, takes up residence in the car's oversize center-mounted speedometer and provides enhanced Bluetooth and iPod functionality, plus smartphone integration (iPhones only). It also serves as the display for the optional navigation system when that's equipped. Keep in mind that many of these extras are package options that must be purchased in combination with one another. The Paceman can be further customized with special body graphics and a range of interior color schemes.

 

MINI Leasing Powertrains and Performance

 

The base 2013 Mini Cooper Paceman uses a 1.6-liter inline four-cylinder engine that produces 121 horsepower and 114 pound-feet of torque. The engine powers the front wheels through a six-speed manual transmission or an optional six-speed automatic.

 

According to Mini, the base Paceman accelerates from zero to 60 mph in 9.7 seconds with the manual gearbox, which is subpar for a small wagon. Fuel economy is impressive, though, at 27 mpg city/35 mpg highway and 30 mpg combined. The automatic-transmission version returns 25/30/27 mpg.

 

The Paceman S uses a turbocharged 1.6-liter engine, which produces 181 hp and 177 lb-ft of torque. The S is available with either front-wheel drive or all-wheel drive (called ALL4), and you have your choice of either the six-speed manual or six-speed automatic transmission on both versions.

 

In Edmunds testing, we managed to hustle a front-drive Paceman S with an automatic transmission to 60 mph in 7.2 seconds. Expect slightly quicker acceleration with the manual but slower acceleration if you choose one of the ALL4 models, as the all-wheel-drive system weighs the car down a bit.

 

Mini estimates fuel economy for the front-drive Paceman S to be 26 mpg city/32 mpg highway and 29 mpg combined. Selecting all-wheel drive or the automatic drops these numbers1-2 mpg.

 

At the top of the line, the John Cooper Works Paceman features an upgraded version of the S model's turbocharged engine that generates 208 hp and 192 lb-ft of torque (with 207 lb-ft available via an overboost function that comes on during full-throttle acceleration). The same transmissions are offered, but all-wheel drive is now standard. Mini says the JCW Paceman will hit 60 mph in 6.5 seconds with either transmission. Expect fuel economy on par with the S ALL4 models.

 

MINI Lease Safety

 

Standard safety equipment includes antilock disc brakes, stability control, front-seat side airbags and side curtain airbags.

 

The S and John Cooper Works models add a dynamic traction control feature (optional on the base 2013 Mini Paceman) that's useful during spirited drives on back roads. In this mode, the stability control system won't intervene quite as early, but there's still a safety net in place if things get out of hand. Rear parking sensors are optional on all versions of the Paceman.

 

In Edmunds testing, a Paceman S with run-flat tires stopped from 60 mph in 120 feet, which is good for a vehicle like this.

 

Interior Design and Special Features Leasing a MINI

 

The Mini Paceman offers significantly more interior space than the standard Mini Cooper hatchback. It provides 38.1 cubic feet of cargo space with the rear seats folded down versus 24 cubic feet even in the standard hatch. That said, the Paceman is still pretty small compared with most other hatchbacks and crossover SUVs. If you regularly haul large items, you can find better options in this price range.

 

The interior of the Paceman is similar to the Countryman, though there are a few small changes: The window switches have moved from the center console to the doors, for example. Rear seat space is pretty much the same, with just a small drop in rear headroom. However, there's no bench seat option, so only two people can ride in the rear bucket seats. In addition, the loss of the rear doors makes getting in and out of the backseat more difficult.

 

The optional Mini Connected electronics interface packs a lot of functionality, with iPhone smartphone app integration providing features such as Internet radio and social media access. Unfortunately, some of the relevant functions require the car to be parked to access, and using Mini Connected can be tricky due to the car's control layout that looks good but is difficult to use. Mini's adjustable center storage rail system is another example of form over function, as it doesn't offer much storage capability but takes up quite a bit of interior space.

 

Lease a MINI Driving Impressions

 

If you've ever piloted the Cooper hatchback, the 2013 Mini Cooper Paceman will feel familiar. Though it's a bit slower and less nimble, the Paceman retains many of the hatch's best traits, including the sporty, precise steering, the distinctive turbo soundtrack (on S and JCW models) and, yes, the sometimes too-firm ride. We recommend staying with the 17-inch wheels if you're concerned about ride quality.

 

While the base Paceman is nimble and light on its feet, it's far from quick. Unless fuel economy is your overriding priority, we'd recommend the more energetic S and JCW models, which are easier to drive in expressway traffic and ultimately a lot more fun. Most buyers will be perfectly happy with the automatic transmission, but if you like manual transmissions, you'll no doubt enjoy the mechanical feel of changing gears in the Paceman.

 

Lease a MINI Cooper Coupe

You've probably heard the adage, "Less is more," extolling the virtues of elegant simplicity. You've also likely heard, "More for less," that elusive point where a deal becomes a steal. But "Less for more?" That's not nearly as common, and for the most part, not at all in your best interests. But that's precisely how we describe the 2013 Mini Cooper Coupe.

 

Mini Touts the Coupe as "geared squarely to maximizing driving fun," and considering how fun the "regular" Mini Cooper is, our interest is certainly piqued. Compared to the Mini Cooper, the Coupe is a two-seater with a raked-back windshield and tapering hatch. It sits a little lower and by that virtue, has a more athletic stance. In terms of performance, though, there's little to distinguish the Coupe from any other Mini.

 

If the 2013 Mini Cooper Coupe has any performance advantages, they're so slight as to be insignificant. What is significant, however, is the fact that you'll pay at least $1,000 for the privilege of having two fewer passengers, poor rear visibility and a busier and less refined ride quality. Less for more, indeed.

 

If anything, the Coupe is a styling exercise, and if its sleeker profile appeals to you, perhaps its drawbacks are an easier pill to swallow. Whether or not that's the case, we'd still recommend checking out some of its competitors. In particular, the 2013 Scion FR-S and its nearly identical 2013 Subaru BR-Z cousin are prime examples of "more for less," with performance that rivals the range-topping Mini John Cooper Works model at a midrange Cooper S price. And let's not count out the standard Mini Cooper, which will deliver the same spirit, more or less.

 

MINI Lease Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

 

The 2013 Mini Cooper Coupe is a two-door two-passenger coupe with a hatchback-style trunk lid. There are three available trim levels: Base, S and John Cooper Works (JCW).

 

The base Coupe comes standard with 15-inch alloy wheels, full power accessories, keyless entry, air-conditioning, cruise control, a height-adjustable driver seat, leatherette (vinyl) upholstery, a tilt-and-telescoping leather-wrapped steering wheel, Bluetooth and a six-speaker sound system with a CD player, HD radio, an auxiliary audio jack and an USB/iPod interface. The optional Sport package adds 16-inch wheels, foglamps, dynamic traction control with electronic differential lock, sport seats and hood stripes.

 

The Coupe S adds 16-inch wheels, a turbocharged engine, a hood scoop, firmer suspension tuning, foglamps, sport seats and alloy pedals. The Coupe S Sport package adds 17-inch wheels, xenon headlights, dynamic traction control and hood stripes. The John Cooper Works trim includes a more powerful turbo engine, upgraded suspension and Brembo brakes, an aerodynamic body kit, John Cooper Works badging and checkered-cloth upholstery.

 

Major optional features (some of which are grouped in packages) include adaptive xenon headlights, automatic climate control, heated seats/mirrors/washer jets, keyless entry/ignition, a 10-speaker Harman Kardon surround-sound audio system, satellite radio and added iPhone functions that include Twitter access, RSS feeds and Web-based radio. Other options include different wheels, parking sensors, cloth or leather upholstery, a navigation system and a multitude of different interior trims and materials. Furthermore, a multitude of dealer-installed accessories are available.

 

MINI Leasing Powertrains and Performance

 

The 2013 Mini Coupe comes with a 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine good for 121 horsepower and 114 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed manual with hill-start assist is standard and a six-speed automatic is optional. Every Mini Coupe comes with a Sport button that sharpens the response and behavior of the throttle, transmission (with the automatic) and steering.

 

Mini estimates a manual-equipped Coupe will go from zero to 60 mph in 8.3 seconds (9.5 seconds with the automatic). EPA-estimated fuel economy is 29 mpg city/37 mpg highway and 32 mpg combined with the manual and 28/36/31 mpg with the automatic.

 

The Cooper S has a turbocharged version of the same engine good for 181 hp and 177 lb-ft of torque (192 lb-ft at full throttle thanks to an overboost function). Mini estimates 0-60-mph acceleration in 6.5 seconds for the manual and 6.7 seconds for the automatic. Estimated fuel economy is 26/35/29 mpg with the manual and 26/34/29 mpg with the auto.

 

The John Cooper Works cranks up the turbo boost to produce 208 hp and 192 lb-ft of torque. Fuel economy is estimated at 26/35/29 mpg with the manual and 25/34/29 mpg with the new automatic. Mini estimates a 0-60 time of 6.1 seconds; our testing revealed slightly slower results, with a 6.4-second best 0-60 time with the manual. As good as these figures are, however, we've recorded nearly identical ones in a regular Cooper JCW hatchback.

 

MINI Lease Safety

 

Standard safety features for all Mini Coupes include antilock disc brakes, stability control, dual front and seat-mounted side airbags. Dynamic traction control, a differential lock and parking sensors are optional. A LATCH child seat tethering system is standard for the passenger seat. In Edmunds testing, a Coupe JCW stopped from 60 mph in a very good 114 feet.

 

Interior Design and Special Features Leasing a MINI

 

As expected, the interior of the Coupe is done up with typical Mini flair, including the infamous toggle switches, giant speedometer and body-colored panels. They're all nice nods to the original Mini, but in terms of practicality, it comes off as a bit gimmicky.

 

At best, the Coupe's cabin feels intimate; at worst, it's claustrophobic. There is no shortage of headroom (thanks to a double-bubble headliner), but unlike the airy feeling in the high-roof Cooper, the Coupe's cabin itself feels rather tight. In place of rear seats, Mini fits the Coupe with a cargo area divider that offers up a small parcel shelf.

 

Luggage space, at 7 cubic feet, is a couple cubes better than a regular Cooper hatchback's, but besides the cargo area pass-through, there's no provision to expand as is the case with the hatchback. Access to the trunk is rather easy, at least, as the rear glass lifts up with the trunk lid like a hatchback. Rear visibility is particularly poor for the Coupe.

 

Lease a MINI Driving Impressions

 

Unfortunately, measurable performance advantages of the two-seat 2013 Mini Coupe over the four-seat Mini Cooper hatchback do not exist. But whether or not the Coupe is reported to be a tenth of a second quicker than the Cooper is largely a moot point. Every Mini's mission, regardless of model/trim is to provide a uniquely sporty driving experience, and the 2013 Mini Coupe fulfills that promise.

 

The Coupe's lower stance and slightly firmer suspension largely result in a slightly busier ride -- especially on the John Cooper Works Coupe, where some have even called it unacceptable. This is why we have historically recommended either the Base or the S trim, but without the optional sport suspension. The car's electric-assist power steering is as good as any manufacturer has developed, with crisp reactions and laserlike precision.

 

Overall, the Base Coupe will likely satisfy most drivers, with the S trim adding a little more thrill with its turbocharged engine. Opting for the 208-hp John Cooper Works Coupe is a commitment that some may later regret.

 

Lease a MINI Cooper Coupe

You've probably heard the adage, "Less is more," extolling the virtues of elegant simplicity. You've also likely heard, "More for less," that elusive point where a deal becomes a steal. But "Less for more?" That's not nearly as common, and for the most part, not at all in your best interests. But that's precisely how we describe the 2013 Mini Cooper Coupe.

 

Mini Touts the Coupe as "geared squarely to maximizing driving fun," and considering how fun the "regular" Mini Cooper is, our interest is certainly piqued. Compared to the Mini Cooper, the Coupe is a two-seater with a raked-back windshield and tapering hatch. It sits a little lower and by that virtue, has a more athletic stance. In terms of performance, though, there's little to distinguish the Coupe from any other Mini.

 

If the 2013 Mini Cooper Coupe has any performance advantages, they're so slight as to be insignificant. What is significant, however, is the fact that you'll pay at least $1,000 for the privilege of having two fewer passengers, poor rear visibility and a busier and less refined ride quality. Less for more, indeed.

 

If anything, the Coupe is a styling exercise, and if its sleeker profile appeals to you, perhaps its drawbacks are an easier pill to swallow. Whether or not that's the case, we'd still recommend checking out some of its competitors. In particular, the 2013 Scion FR-S and its nearly identical 2013 Subaru BR-Z cousin are prime examples of "more for less," with performance that rivals the range-topping Mini John Cooper Works model at a midrange Cooper S price. And let's not count out the standard Mini Cooper, which will deliver the same spirit, more or less.

 

MINI Lease Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

 

The 2013 Mini Cooper Coupe is a two-door two-passenger coupe with a hatchback-style trunk lid. There are three available trim levels: Base, S and John Cooper Works (JCW).

 

The base Coupe comes standard with 15-inch alloy wheels, full power accessories, keyless entry, air-conditioning, cruise control, a height-adjustable driver seat, leatherette (vinyl) upholstery, a tilt-and-telescoping leather-wrapped steering wheel, Bluetooth and a six-speaker sound system with a CD player, HD radio, an auxiliary audio jack and an USB/iPod interface. The optional Sport package adds 16-inch wheels, foglamps, dynamic traction control with electronic differential lock, sport seats and hood stripes.

 

The Coupe S adds 16-inch wheels, a turbocharged engine, a hood scoop, firmer suspension tuning, foglamps, sport seats and alloy pedals. The Coupe S Sport package adds 17-inch wheels, xenon headlights, dynamic traction control and hood stripes. The John Cooper Works trim includes a more powerful turbo engine, upgraded suspension and Brembo brakes, an aerodynamic body kit, John Cooper Works badging and checkered-cloth upholstery.

 

Major optional features (some of which are grouped in packages) include adaptive xenon headlights, automatic climate control, heated seats/mirrors/washer jets, keyless entry/ignition, a 10-speaker Harman Kardon surround-sound audio system, satellite radio and added iPhone functions that include Twitter access, RSS feeds and Web-based radio. Other options include different wheels, parking sensors, cloth or leather upholstery, a navigation system and a multitude of different interior trims and materials. Furthermore, a multitude of dealer-installed accessories are available.

 

MINI Leasing Powertrains and Performance

 

The 2013 Mini Coupe comes with a 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine good for 121 horsepower and 114 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed manual with hill-start assist is standard and a six-speed automatic is optional. Every Mini Coupe comes with a Sport button that sharpens the response and behavior of the throttle, transmission (with the automatic) and steering.

 

Mini estimates a manual-equipped Coupe will go from zero to 60 mph in 8.3 seconds (9.5 seconds with the automatic). EPA-estimated fuel economy is 29 mpg city/37 mpg highway and 32 mpg combined with the manual and 28/36/31 mpg with the automatic.

 

The Cooper S has a turbocharged version of the same engine good for 181 hp and 177 lb-ft of torque (192 lb-ft at full throttle thanks to an overboost function). Mini estimates 0-60-mph acceleration in 6.5 seconds for the manual and 6.7 seconds for the automatic. Estimated fuel economy is 26/35/29 mpg with the manual and 26/34/29 mpg with the auto.

 

The John Cooper Works cranks up the turbo boost to produce 208 hp and 192 lb-ft of torque. Fuel economy is estimated at 26/35/29 mpg with the manual and 25/34/29 mpg with the new automatic. Mini estimates a 0-60 time of 6.1 seconds; our testing revealed slightly slower results, with a 6.4-second best 0-60 time with the manual. As good as these figures are, however, we've recorded nearly identical ones in a regular Cooper JCW hatchback.

 

MINI Lease Safety

 

Standard safety features for all Mini Coupes include antilock disc brakes, stability control, dual front and seat-mounted side airbags. Dynamic traction control, a differential lock and parking sensors are optional. A LATCH child seat tethering system is standard for the passenger seat. In Edmunds testing, a Coupe JCW stopped from 60 mph in a very good 114 feet.

 

Interior Design and Special Features Leasing a MINI

 

As expected, the interior of the Coupe is done up with typical Mini flair, including the infamous toggle switches, giant speedometer and body-colored panels. They're all nice nods to the original Mini, but in terms of practicality, it comes off as a bit gimmicky.

 

At best, the Coupe's cabin feels intimate; at worst, it's claustrophobic. There is no shortage of headroom (thanks to a double-bubble headliner), but unlike the airy feeling in the high-roof Cooper, the Coupe's cabin itself feels rather tight. In place of rear seats, Mini fits the Coupe with a cargo area divider that offers up a small parcel shelf.

 

Luggage space, at 7 cubic feet, is a couple cubes better than a regular Cooper hatchback's, but besides the cargo area pass-through, there's no provision to expand as is the case with the hatchback. Access to the trunk is rather easy, at least, as the rear glass lifts up with the trunk lid like a hatchback. Rear visibility is particularly poor for the Coupe.

 

Lease a MINI Driving Impressions

 

Unfortunately, measurable performance advantages of the two-seat 2013 Mini Coupe over the four-seat Mini Cooper hatchback do not exist. But whether or not the Coupe is reported to be a tenth of a second quicker than the Cooper is largely a moot point. Every Mini's mission, regardless of model/trim is to provide a uniquely sporty driving experience, and the 2013 Mini Coupe fulfills that promise.

 

The Coupe's lower stance and slightly firmer suspension largely result in a slightly busier ride -- especially on the John Cooper Works Coupe, where some have even called it unacceptable. This is why we have historically recommended either the Base or the S trim, but without the optional sport suspension. The car's electric-assist power steering is as good as any manufacturer has developed, with crisp reactions and laserlike precision.

 

Overall, the Base Coupe will likely satisfy most drivers, with the S trim adding a little more thrill with its turbocharged engine. Opting for the 208-hp John Cooper Works Coupe is a commitment that some may later regret.

 

Lease a MINI Cooper Coupe

You've probably heard the adage, "Less is more," extolling the virtues of elegant simplicity. You've also likely heard, "More for less," that elusive point where a deal becomes a steal. But "Less for more?" That's not nearly as common, and for the most part, not at all in your best interests. But that's precisely how we describe the 2013 Mini Cooper Coupe.

 

Mini Touts the Coupe as "geared squarely to maximizing driving fun," and considering how fun the "regular" Mini Cooper is, our interest is certainly piqued. Compared to the Mini Cooper, the Coupe is a two-seater with a raked-back windshield and tapering hatch. It sits a little lower and by that virtue, has a more athletic stance. In terms of performance, though, there's little to distinguish the Coupe from any other Mini.

 

If the 2013 Mini Cooper Coupe has any performance advantages, they're so slight as to be insignificant. What is significant, however, is the fact that you'll pay at least $1,000 for the privilege of having two fewer passengers, poor rear visibility and a busier and less refined ride quality. Less for more, indeed.

 

If anything, the Coupe is a styling exercise, and if its sleeker profile appeals to you, perhaps its drawbacks are an easier pill to swallow. Whether or not that's the case, we'd still recommend checking out some of its competitors. In particular, the 2013 Scion FR-S and its nearly identical 2013 Subaru BR-Z cousin are prime examples of "more for less," with performance that rivals the range-topping Mini John Cooper Works model at a midrange Cooper S price. And let's not count out the standard Mini Cooper, which will deliver the same spirit, more or less.

 

MINI Lease Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

 

The 2013 Mini Cooper Coupe is a two-door two-passenger coupe with a hatchback-style trunk lid. There are three available trim levels: Base, S and John Cooper Works (JCW).

 

The base Coupe comes standard with 15-inch alloy wheels, full power accessories, keyless entry, air-conditioning, cruise control, a height-adjustable driver seat, leatherette (vinyl) upholstery, a tilt-and-telescoping leather-wrapped steering wheel, Bluetooth and a six-speaker sound system with a CD player, HD radio, an auxiliary audio jack and an USB/iPod interface. The optional Sport package adds 16-inch wheels, foglamps, dynamic traction control with electronic differential lock, sport seats and hood stripes.

 

The Coupe S adds 16-inch wheels, a turbocharged engine, a hood scoop, firmer suspension tuning, foglamps, sport seats and alloy pedals. The Coupe S Sport package adds 17-inch wheels, xenon headlights, dynamic traction control and hood stripes. The John Cooper Works trim includes a more powerful turbo engine, upgraded suspension and Brembo brakes, an aerodynamic body kit, John Cooper Works badging and checkered-cloth upholstery.

 

Major optional features (some of which are grouped in packages) include adaptive xenon headlights, automatic climate control, heated seats/mirrors/washer jets, keyless entry/ignition, a 10-speaker Harman Kardon surround-sound audio system, satellite radio and added iPhone functions that include Twitter access, RSS feeds and Web-based radio. Other options include different wheels, parking sensors, cloth or leather upholstery, a navigation system and a multitude of different interior trims and materials. Furthermore, a multitude of dealer-installed accessories are available.

 

MINI Leasing Powertrains and Performance

 

The 2013 Mini Coupe comes with a 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine good for 121 horsepower and 114 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed manual with hill-start assist is standard and a six-speed automatic is optional. Every Mini Coupe comes with a Sport button that sharpens the response and behavior of the throttle, transmission (with the automatic) and steering.

 

Mini estimates a manual-equipped Coupe will go from zero to 60 mph in 8.3 seconds (9.5 seconds with the automatic). EPA-estimated fuel economy is 29 mpg city/37 mpg highway and 32 mpg combined with the manual and 28/36/31 mpg with the automatic.

 

The Cooper S has a turbocharged version of the same engine good for 181 hp and 177 lb-ft of torque (192 lb-ft at full throttle thanks to an overboost function). Mini estimates 0-60-mph acceleration in 6.5 seconds for the manual and 6.7 seconds for the automatic. Estimated fuel economy is 26/35/29 mpg with the manual and 26/34/29 mpg with the auto.

 

The John Cooper Works cranks up the turbo boost to produce 208 hp and 192 lb-ft of torque. Fuel economy is estimated at 26/35/29 mpg with the manual and 25/34/29 mpg with the new automatic. Mini estimates a 0-60 time of 6.1 seconds; our testing revealed slightly slower results, with a 6.4-second best 0-60 time with the manual. As good as these figures are, however, we've recorded nearly identical ones in a regular Cooper JCW hatchback.

 

MINI Lease Safety

 

Standard safety features for all Mini Coupes include antilock disc brakes, stability control, dual front and seat-mounted side airbags. Dynamic traction control, a differential lock and parking sensors are optional. A LATCH child seat tethering system is standard for the passenger seat. In Edmunds testing, a Coupe JCW stopped from 60 mph in a very good 114 feet.

 

Interior Design and Special Features Leasing a MINI

 

As expected, the interior of the Coupe is done up with typical Mini flair, including the infamous toggle switches, giant speedometer and body-colored panels. They're all nice nods to the original Mini, but in terms of practicality, it comes off as a bit gimmicky.

 

At best, the Coupe's cabin feels intimate; at worst, it's claustrophobic. There is no shortage of headroom (thanks to a double-bubble headliner), but unlike the airy feeling in the high-roof Cooper, the Coupe's cabin itself feels rather tight. In place of rear seats, Mini fits the Coupe with a cargo area divider that offers up a small parcel shelf.

 

Luggage space, at 7 cubic feet, is a couple cubes better than a regular Cooper hatchback's, but besides the cargo area pass-through, there's no provision to expand as is the case with the hatchback. Access to the trunk is rather easy, at least, as the rear glass lifts up with the trunk lid like a hatchback. Rear visibility is particularly poor for the Coupe.

 

Lease a MINI Driving Impressions

 

Unfortunately, measurable performance advantages of the two-seat 2013 Mini Coupe over the four-seat Mini Cooper hatchback do not exist. But whether or not the Coupe is reported to be a tenth of a second quicker than the Cooper is largely a moot point. Every Mini's mission, regardless of model/trim is to provide a uniquely sporty driving experience, and the 2013 Mini Coupe fulfills that promise.

 

The Coupe's lower stance and slightly firmer suspension largely result in a slightly busier ride -- especially on the John Cooper Works Coupe, where some have even called it unacceptable. This is why we have historically recommended either the Base or the S trim, but without the optional sport suspension. The car's electric-assist power steering is as good as any manufacturer has developed, with crisp reactions and laserlike precision.

 

Overall, the Base Coupe will likely satisfy most drivers, with the S trim adding a little more thrill with its turbocharged engine. Opting for the 208-hp John Cooper Works Coupe is a commitment that some may later regret.

 

Lease a MINI Cooper Countryman

Buyers considering a Mini Cooper have long understood that the iconic hatchback goes big on style and performance potential at the expense of utility. With two adult passengers, the Cooper leaves about enough room for some groceries or maybe a couple weekend bags. Forget about trying to put people you consider friends in the cramped backseat.

 

But as evidenced by Mini's long sales success, a vast Mini fan base is willing to make this trade. The 2013 Mini Countryman, however, offers an alternative. In recent years, Mini has broadened its audience with larger, more versatile models. The largest in the lineup is the Countryman, a wagonesque four-door hatchback that offers almost three times the cargo capacity of the Cooper hatchback along with a usable rear seat. The sliding rear seat provides enough comfortable legroom for adults, expanding or decreasing cargo space as it moves fore and aft. The rear seat also folds almost completely flat for enhanced cargo capacity.

 

The Countryman is larger than a standard Cooper, but it still feels pretty nimble when going around corners. Acceleration is rather pokey with the base engine, however, so we recommend opting for the turbocharged engine in the S or JCW models. Of course, just as with Mini's other models, the Countryman also offers the same dizzying array of customization options, everything from heated mirrors and a different color roof to hood stripes.

 

Being a Mini means the Countryman is still relatively petite, and therefore less spacious than other small wagons like the 2013 Kia Soul or crossover SUVs such as the Ford Escape, Honda CR-V and Mazda CX-5. There's also noticeable road noise to contend with, along with a fairly stiff-legged ride. Similar trade-offs are made for Nissan's Juke, though the Juke is less expensive. The forthcoming 2014 Fiat 500L should also be considered and, on the high end, the BMW X1. About the same length as the Countryman, the 500L offers similar passenger room, larger cargo capacity and a more powerful base engine.

 

Still, with its entertaining handling and vast potential to personalize, the 2013 Mini Cooper Countryman is simply more fun than most of those other models (though the Escape and CX-5 are more entertaining than you might think). It gets our nod for drivers who don't mind making a few sacrifices for the sake of pleasure.

 

MINI Lease Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

 

The 2013 Mini Cooper Countryman is a compact wagon available in base, S and John Cooper Works trim levels.

 

The base Countryman comes standard with 17-inch alloy wheels, adjustable steering and throttle settings, roof rails, full power accessories, cruise control, air-conditioning, a height-adjustable driver seat, leatherette (vinyl) upholstery, a tilt-and-telescoping leather-wrapped steering wheel, a trip computer, Bluetooth and a six-speaker sound system with a CD player, HD radio and USB/iPod and auxiliary audio jacks.

 

The Countryman S adds a turbocharged engine, a rear spoiler, different exterior trim, an adjustable traction control system, foglamps and sport seats. The latter three items are also available on the base car. The John Cooper Works is similar but has a more powerful engine, 18-inch wheels, a sport-tuned suspension and special interior styling details.

 

The Countryman offers a staggering number of options, both stand-alone and within packages. Some highlights include 18- or 19-inch wheels, a sport-tuned suspension, adaptive xenon headlamps, keyless ignition/entry, heated mirrors, rear parking sensors, a dual-pane sunroof, leather upholstery, heated front seats, rear bucket seats and a premium 10-speaker Harman Kardon audio system. The Countryman can be further customized with special body graphics and a range of different interior color schemes.

 

Also available is Mini Connected, which features a large display inside the central speedometer and a corresponding console-mounted controller that operates Bluetooth, iPod and smartphone integration. A navigation system can also be added to Mini Connected.

 

MINI Leasing Powertrains and Performance

 

The 2013 Mini Cooper Countryman uses a 1.6-liter inline four-cylinder engine that produces 121 horsepower and 114 pound-feet of torque. The engine powers the front wheels through a six-speed manual transmission or an optional six-speed automatic.

 

Mini estimates that the base Countryman accelerates from zero to 60 mp in 9.8 seconds (manual transmission) and 10.9 seconds (automatic) -- both subpar for a small wagon. EPA-estimated fuel economy is quite good though, at 27 mpg city/35 mpg highway and 30 mpg combined with the manual and 25/30/27 with the automatic. Premium fuel is required.

 

The Countryman S uses a turbocharged version of the same 1.6-liter engine, which produces 181 hp and 177 lb-ft of torque. This engine also powers the front wheels through either a six-speed manual or automatic transmission, but the S offers optional all-wheel drive ("ALL4" in Mini parlance).

 

In Edmunds testing, a manual Countryman S ALL4 accelerated from zero to 60 mph in 7.6 seconds. Expect slightly quicker acceleration on the front-wheel-drive model, while automatic-equipped versions will be a bit slower. EPA-estimated fuel economy ranges from 26/32/29 with front-wheel drive and the manual to 23/30/26 with ALL4 and the automatic.

 

The John Cooper Works features a revised version of the S model's turbocharged engine; here it generates 211 hp and 207 lb-ft of torque. The same transmissions are offered, and all-wheel drive is standard. Mini estimates the 0-60-mph sprint will take 7.1 seconds with the manual or 7.5 with the automatic. Fuel economy ratings are the same as for the Countryman S.

 

MINI Lease Safety

 

Standard safety equipment includes antilock disc brakes, stability control, front-seat side airbags and side curtain airbags. Adjustable traction control is standard on the S and optional on the base 2013 Mini Countryman. Rear parking sensors are optional.

 

In Edmunds brake testing, a Countryman S stopped from 60 mph in 117 feet -- an excellent distance for a small wagon. In the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety's frontal-offset, side-impact and roof-strength crash tests, the Countryman earned the best possible rating of "Good."

 

Interior Design and Special Features Leasing a MINI

 

The Countryman's passenger compartment will surprise shoppers expecting the Cooper hatchback's traditionally cramped quarters. A rear bench seat that slides and reclines is standard, and two reclining bucket seats are a no-cost option. Either way, there's enough room to accommodate 6-foot passengers in both rows with the rear seats moved back.

 

That said, the Countryman forces you to choose between rear-seat passenger space and cargo capacity. With the backseat all the way back and the clever flip-up trunk partition in place, the Countryman's cargo area isn't much larger than a Cooper Clubman's. Lowering the rear seats nets 41.3 cubic feet of maximum space -- approximately halfway between that of a Kia Sportage and a Nissan Juke.

 

Quirky styling flourishes like the oversized central speedometer are charming reminders that the Countryman is indeed a Mini. But the wagon also shares the regular Cooper's penchant for small and sometimes frustrating controls that value form over function. The adjustable center storage rail system is another example, as it looks neat in theory but actually offers little useful storage capacity. The Countryman at least has up-to-date electronics: The optional Mini Connected infotainment feature offers smartphone app integration using a 6.5-inch display located in the center of the car's speedometer.

 

Lease a MINI Driving Impressions

 

If you've ever piloted the Cooper hatchback, the 2013 Mini Cooper Countryman will feel familiar. Though it's a bit slower and less nimble, the Countryman retains many of the hatch's best traits, including the sporty, precise steering, the S engines' distinctive turbo soundtrack and, yes, the sometimes too-firm ride. If you get the manual transmission, you'll likely enjoy the mechanical feel of changing gears in this car, though the clutch take-up is not as smooth as it could be.

 

While the base engine performs fine in the lighter Cooper, it's not up to the task of briskly motivating the Countryman's 500 additional pounds. The crossover wagon's nearly 11-second sprint to 60 mph lags behind even slowpoke competitors like the Mitsubishi Outlander Sport. Unless fuel economy is a primary concern, we recommend the S model, as it returns respectable mpg and multiple times the driving enjoyment.

 

Though we've yet to test the John Cooper Works, it should be similar to other Mini JCW models, which is to say it will offer even better performance and handling, though at the expense of an even stiffer ride quality.

 

Lease a MINI Cooper Convertible

When it comes to small cars, the 2013 Mini Cooper excels at appealing to a wide range of drivers. For the aesthetically inclined, the Cooper is easy on the eyes; both its cute sheet metal and stylized cabin exude retro chic. Yet if driving is more your thing, the Cooper's still got you covered with quick acceleration and handling sharp enough to make J.A. Henckels jealous. It's no wonder the Mini has been such an enduring favorite with us.

 

There isn't a loser in the Mini Cooper family, since even base models boast reasonably crisp acceleration. A turbocharged Cooper S is available and is our favored choice, but if you've got an insatiable need for speed, then we suggest the top-level John Cooper Works edition. Furthermore, all Minis can be customized to a level unmatched by any other car in this price range thanks to factory personalization options and dealer-installed accessories.

 

The Mini also satisfies in more mundane ways, as even the most potent version offers very good fuel economy. Its petite dimensions make the 2013 Mini Cooper an ideal companion for drivers who frequently park on congested urban streets. And despite its small footprint, the car offers comfortable and spacious accommodations for two.

 

That's not to say this effervescent little Brit is without flaw. The downside to its sharp handling is a firm ride that can be jarring on rough pavement. And you can forget about trying to squeeze adults into that cramped backseat; for four-seat capacity, you'll need to take a look at the long-wheelbase Cooper Clubman or four-door Countryman.

 

Drivers looking for a similarly adorable European charmer with a more forgiving ride (though less sporty handling) will want to check out the 2013 Fiat 500 and 2013 Volvo C30. The relatively spacious 2013 Hyundai Veloster is also worth considering. As far as convertibles go, the BMW 1 Series delivers impressive refinement, while you'll get outstanding feature content with the Volkswagen Eos and ample style with the Fiat 500 convertible.

 

Overall, though, the Mini Cooper is one of the most well-rounded small cars in this group, and it easily wins our affection with its charm, performance and fuel efficiency.

 

MINI Lease Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

 

The 2013 Mini Cooper is available in two-door hatchback and convertible body styles. Each is available in three trim levels: Cooper, Cooper S and John Cooper Works (JCW).

 

The base Cooper comes standard with 15-inch alloy wheels, full power accessories, keyless entry, air-conditioning, cruise control, a height-adjustable driver seat, leatherette (vinyl) upholstery, floor mats, a tilt-and-telescoping leather-wrapped steering wheel, multicolor ambient lighting, Bluetooth and a six-speaker stereo with a CD player, HD radio, a USB/iPod adapter and an auxiliary audio jack. The Cooper convertible model adds 16-inch alloy wheels and a full power convertible top that includes a sunroof feature. The Cooper's Sport package adds 16-inch wheels on the hatchback and 17-inch wheels on the convertible, foglamps, traction control, a rear spoiler, sport seats and hood stripes.

 

The Cooper S adds 16-inch wheels, a turbocharged engine, firmer suspension tuning, foglamps, sport seats and alloy pedals. The Cooper S Sport package adds 17-inch wheels, xenon headlights, traction control and hood stripes. The John Cooper Works includes a more powerful turbo engine, upgraded Brembo brakes, an aerodynamic body kit and cloth upholstery. A limited-slip differential and a firmer suspension can be fitted to both the S and the John Cooper Works.

 

Major optional features (some of which are grouped in packages) include adaptive xenon headlights, a dual-pane sunroof, automatic climate control, heated front seats, keyless ignition/entry, satellite radio and a 10-speaker Harman Kardon audio system. Others include different wheels, parking sensors, cloth or leather upholstery, a navigation system, smartphone app integration and a multitude of different interior trims and materials. Furthermore, many dealer-installed features are available.

 

MINI Leasing Powertrains and Performance

 

The 2013 Mini Cooper comes with a 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine good for 121 horsepower and 114 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed manual with hill-start assist is standard, and a six-speed automatic is optional. Mini estimates a manual-equipped hatchback will go from zero to 60 mph in 8.3 seconds (9.5 seconds with the automatic). EPA-estimated fuel economy is 29 mpg city/37 mpg highway and 32 mpg combined with the manual (27/35/31 convertible) and 28/36/31 with the automatic.

 

The Cooper S has a turbocharged version of the same engine good for 181 hp and 177 lb-ft of torque (192 lb-ft at full throttle thanks to an overboost function). Mini estimates 0-60-mph acceleration in 6.5 seconds for the manual and 6.7 seconds for the automatic. EPA estimated fuel economy is 26/35/29 with the manual and 26/34/29 with the auto.

 

The John Cooper Works cranks up the turbo boost to produce 208 hp and 192 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed manual or a six-speed automatic are again available, with the latter being a new option for the JCW this year. Mini estimates a 0-60 time of 6.2 seconds for the hatchback and 6.6 for the convertible. Fuel economy is 26/35/29 for the manual and 26/34/29 for the automatic.

 

MINI Lease Safety

 

The list of standard safety features on the 2013 Mini Cooper includes antilock disc brakes, stability control and front-seat side airbags. The hatchback comes with side curtain airbags as standard equipment, while the convertible features pop-up rollover bars and larger front side airbags that extend to head height. Traction control is optional. In Edmunds braking, various Mini Cooper S models with 17-inch wheels stopped from 60 mph between 112 and 115 feet -- excellent results.

 

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety gave the hatchback its best rating of "Good" in the frontal-offset test, and its second-best score of "Average" in the side-impact and roof-crush tests.

 

Interior Design and Special Features Leasing a MINI

 

The aesthetic within the Mini's cabin brims with a sense of playfulness and fun. The gigantic center-mounted speedometer is a reference to the Mini of old, but the design isn't entirely intuitive and is probably too cutesy for some tastes. The Mini is up to date in terms of electronics, though. Mini's optional Mini Connected infotainment feature offers smartphone integration using a 6.5-inch display located in the center of the car's speedometer. Downloading a free app onto your smartphone allows easy access to Facebook, Twitter and a slew of Internet radio stations, including Pandora. Additionally, Mini Connected includes Google search and send-to-car functionality.

 

The car's front seats are swimming in legroom, and ample headroom helps lend the cabin an open, airy feel. In back, however, things are considerably more claustrophobic, with a lack of legroom that makes seating adult passengers in comfort a virtual impossibility. With just 5.7 cubic feet on tap, there's also a dearth of cargo space, but folding the rear seats flat increases that to a very usable 24 cubes.

 

With the convertible, you get a sunroof function that allows you to retract the forward portion of the soft top as opposed to lowering it completely. Its tailgate-style trunk opening features an upper package tray that can be raised to allow larger items to fit in the tiny 6-cubic-foot trunk. Unlike with most convertibles, the Mini's rear seats can be folded flat to accommodate larger items, but the rollover hoops and soft-top mechanism prevent the loading of bulkier objects. Rear visibility for the convertible is poor with the top down (as it stacks rather high) and even worse with the top up.

 

Lease a MINI Driving Impressions

 

All three trims of the 2013 Mini Cooper share an engaging personality thank to eager response to driver inputs. The trade-off is a ride that can be noticeably stiff-legged and somewhat raucous as well. Ride quality gets even firmer with the Cooper S and John Cooper Works models. For comfort's sake, our recommendation is that mainstream buyers skip the sport suspension options and the larger wheels.

 

Most drivers will likely be plenty happy with the base Cooper, but the thrills increase with the S, while the JCW pumps up the fun quotient to full blast. With the six-speed manual transmission, you get a remarkably precise shifter and an acquiescent clutch. Shifts in the automatic aren't especially smooth, but put it in Manual mode and you're rewarded with quick responses to inputs made via the steering-wheel-mounted shift paddles.

 

For 2013, Bluetooth is now standard on all Mini Coopers, while satellite radio is now an option instead of standard equipment. A USB/iPod adapter is now standard, and John Cooper Works models are now available with an automatic transmission.

 

Lease a MINI Cooper Hardtop Introduction

 

When it comes to small cars, the 2013 Mini Cooper excels at appealing to a wide range of drivers. For the aesthetically inclined, the Cooper is easy on the eyes; both its cute sheet metal and stylized cabin exude retro chic. Yet if driving is more your thing, the Cooper's still got you covered with quick acceleration and handling sharp enough to make J.A. Henckels jealous. It's no wonder the Mini has been such an enduring favorite with us.

 

There isn't a loser in the Mini Cooper family, since even base models boast reasonably crisp acceleration. A turbocharged Cooper S is available and is our favored choice, but if you've got an insatiable need for speed, then we suggest the top-level John Cooper Works edition. Furthermore, all Minis can be customized to a level unmatched by any other car in this price range thanks to factory personalization options and dealer-installed accessories.

 

The Mini also satisfies in more mundane ways, as even the most potent version offers very good fuel economy. Its petite dimensions make the 2013 Mini Cooper an ideal companion for drivers who frequently park on congested urban streets. And despite its small footprint, the car offers comfortable and spacious accommodations for two.

 

That's not to say this effervescent little Brit is without flaw. The downside to its sharp handling is a firm ride that can be jarring on rough pavement. And you can forget about trying to squeeze adults into that cramped backseat; for four-seat capacity, you'll need to take a look at the long-wheelbase Cooper Clubman or four-door Countryman.

 

Drivers looking for a similarly adorable European charmer with a more forgiving ride (though less sporty handling) will want to check out the 2013 Fiat 500 and 2013 Volvo C30. The relatively spacious 2013 Hyundai Veloster is also worth considering. As far as convertibles go, the BMW 1 Series delivers impressive refinement, while you'll get outstanding feature content with the Volkswagen Eos and ample style with the Fiat 500 convertible.

 

Overall, though, the Mini Cooper is one of the most well-rounded small cars in this group, and it easily wins our affection with its charm, performance and fuel efficiency.

 

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options Leasing MINI Cooper Hardtop

 

The 2013 Mini Cooper is available in two-door hatchback and convertible body styles. Each is available in three trim levels: Cooper, Cooper S and John Cooper Works (JCW).

 

The base Cooper comes standard with 15-inch alloy wheels, full power accessories, keyless entry, air-conditioning, cruise control, a height-adjustable driver seat, leatherette (vinyl) upholstery, floor mats, a tilt-and-telescoping leather-wrapped steering wheel, multicolor ambient lighting, Bluetooth and a six-speaker stereo with a CD player, HD radio, a USB/iPod adapter and an auxiliary audio jack. The Cooper convertible model adds 16-inch alloy wheels and a full power convertible top that includes a sunroof feature. The Cooper's Sport package adds 16-inch wheels on the hatchback and 17-inch wheels on the convertible, foglamps, traction control, a rear spoiler, sport seats and hood stripes.

 

The Cooper S adds 16-inch wheels, a turbocharged engine, firmer suspension tuning, foglamps, sport seats and alloy pedals. The Cooper S Sport package adds 17-inch wheels, xenon headlights, traction control and hood stripes. The John Cooper Works includes a more powerful turbo engine, upgraded Brembo brakes, an aerodynamic body kit and cloth upholstery. A limited-slip differential and a firmer suspension can be fitted to both the S and the John Cooper Works.

 

Major optional features (some of which are grouped in packages) include adaptive xenon headlights, a dual-pane sunroof, automatic climate control, heated front seats, keyless ignition/entry, satellite radio and a 10-speaker Harman Kardon audio system. Others include different wheels, parking sensors, cloth or leather upholstery, a navigation system, smartphone app integration and a multitude of different interior trims and materials. Furthermore, many dealer-installed features are available.

 

MINI Cooper Hardtop Lease Powertrains and Performance

 

The 2013 Mini Cooper comes with a 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine good for 121 horsepower and 114 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed manual with hill-start assist is standard, and a six-speed automatic is optional. Mini estimates a manual-equipped hatchback will go from zero to 60 mph in 8.3 seconds (9.5 seconds with the automatic). EPA-estimated fuel economy is 29 mpg city/37 mpg highway and 32 mpg combined with the manual (27/35/31 convertible) and 28/36/31 with the automatic.

 

The Cooper S has a turbocharged version of the same engine good for 181 hp and 177 lb-ft of torque (192 lb-ft at full throttle thanks to an overboost function). Mini estimates 0-60-mph acceleration in 6.5 seconds for the manual and 6.7 seconds for the automatic. EPA estimated fuel economy is 26/35/29 with the manual and 26/34/29 with the auto.

 

The John Cooper Works cranks up the turbo boost to produce 208 hp and 192 lb-ft of torque. A six-speed manual or a six-speed automatic are again available, with the latter being a new option for the JCW this year. Mini estimates a 0-60 time of 6.2 seconds for the hatchback and 6.6 for the convertible. Fuel economy is 26/35/29 for the manual and 26/34/29 for the automatic.

 

Safety Leasing MINI Cooper Hardtop

 

The list of standard safety features on the 2013 Mini Cooper includes antilock disc brakes, stability control and front-seat side airbags. The hatchback comes with side curtain airbags as standard equipment, while the convertible features pop-up rollover bars and larger front side airbags that extend to head height. Traction control is optional. In Edmunds braking, various Mini Cooper S models with 17-inch wheels stopped from 60 mph between 112 and 115 feet -- excellent results.

 

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety gave the hatchback its best rating of "Good" in the frontal-offset test, and its second-best score of "Average" in the side-impact and roof-crush tests.

 

Interior Design and Special Features MINI Cooper Hardtop Lease

 

The aesthetic within the Mini's cabin brims with a sense of playfulness and fun. The gigantic center-mounted speedometer is a reference to the Mini of old, but the design isn't entirely intuitive and is probably too cutesy for some tastes. The Mini is up to date in terms of electronics, though. Mini's optional Mini Connected infotainment feature offers smartphone integration using a 6.5-inch display located in the center of the car's speedometer. Downloading a free app onto your smartphone allows easy access to Facebook, Twitter and a slew of Internet radio stations, including Pandora. Additionally, Mini Connected includes Google search and send-to-car functionality.

 

The car's front seats are swimming in legroom, and ample headroom helps lend the cabin an open, airy feel. In back, however, things are considerably more claustrophobic, with a lack of legroom that makes seating adult passengers in comfort a virtual impossibility. With just 5.7 cubic feet on tap, there's also a dearth of cargo space, but folding the rear seats flat increases that to a very usable 24 cubes.

 

With the convertible, you get a sunroof function that allows you to retract the forward portion of the soft top as opposed to lowering it completely. Its tailgate-style trunk opening features an upper package tray that can be raised to allow larger items to fit in the tiny 6-cubic-foot trunk. Unlike with most convertibles, the Mini's rear seats can be folded flat to accommodate larger items, but the rollover hoops and soft-top mechanism prevent the loading of bulkier objects. Rear visibility for the convertible is poor with the top down (as it stacks rather high) and even worse with the top up.

 

Lease a MINI Cooper Hardtop Driving Impressions

 

All three trims of the 2013 Mini Cooper share an engaging personality thank to eager response to driver inputs. The trade-off is a ride that can be noticeably stiff-legged and somewhat raucous as well. Ride quality gets even firmer with the Cooper S and John Cooper Works models. For comfort's sake, our recommendation is that mainstream buyers skip the sport suspension options and the larger wheels.

 

Most drivers will likely be plenty happy with the base Cooper, but the thrills increase with the S, while the JCW pumps up the fun quotient to full blast. With the six-speed manual transmission, you get a remarkably precise shifter and an acquiescent clutch. Shifts in the automatic aren't especially smooth, but put it in Manual mode and you're rewarded with quick responses to inputs made via the steering-wheel-mounted shift paddles.