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Lease a Porsche Boxter 

About 300,000 Porsche Boxsters (and a few Caymans) have hit the road since production started in 1996, making it one of the most recognizable sports cars on the road. With the 2013 Porsche Boxster, the car has been comprehensively revised as the nameplate enters its third generation, yet it retains all the style and excitement that have made it the choice of so many.

 

The new Boxster improves on its predecessor in ways both subtle and significant. First, it looks sharper. Many of its sensual curves give way to creases, angles and increased definition along its flanks. A shortened nose also gives the Boxster a more cab-forward appearance, while LED taillights modernize the rear end, plus interior comfort improves with more cabin space.

 

Underneath the metal, the 2013 Porsche Boxster rides on a longer, wider and lower chassis that refines its handling behavior even as larger wheels and tires improve cornering grip. The Boxster has also shed weight; it's now 55 to nearly 80 pounds lighter. Finally, a new and improved engine for the base Boxster provides more power and better fuel economy.

 

Porsche purists indignantly kicked up a storm when the new Porsche 911 incorporated electric-assist steering, a measure that helps improve fuel economy, though often at the cost of compromising communication from the tires. The Boxster also has electric-assist steering, and we'll say that the new system is so good that only a Porsche purist with a heightened imagination could feel the difference from the previous hydraulic-assist setup.

 

As with every Porsche, the price of a 2013 Boxster can escalate with just a handful of options. And boy do you have options -- an almost overwhelming array of leather trim, electronic gadgets, wheel choices and performance upgrades. It'll take a few evenings study of the manufacturer's product guide to sort through them all.

 

The 2013 Porsche Boxster competes against a decidedly small group of rivals, each with its own strengths. The BMW Z4 and Mercedes-Benz SLK-Class are the most notable, and both benefit from additional headroom and a folding hardtop. But if performance ranks at the top of your must-haves, the Porsche Boxster remains unparalleled.

 

Lease a Porsche Boxter Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options 

 

The 2013 Porsche Boxster is a two-seat convertible offered in base and S trims. Base models come equipped with 18-inch wheels, a power-operated soft top, cruise control, six-way-adjustable seats (power backrest, manual fore/aft and height), a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, air-conditioning, partial leather upholstery, Bluetooth and a four-speaker sound system with a CD player. Stepping up to the Boxster S gets you a bigger engine, 19-inch wheels, bi-xenon headlights and red-painted brake calipers.

 

As usual, Porsche will allow you to spend a small country's GDP on options. The Convenience package adds a wind deflector, heated seats and dual-zone automatic climate control. Upgrading to the Premium package includes those features plus adaptive headlights (bi-xenon for the base Boxster), 10-way-adjustable power sport seats (with four-way power lumbar) and auto-dimming mirrors. The Infotainment package gets a navigation system and a seven-speaker sound system with satellite radio and iPod/USB connectivity.

 

The items in packages can be added separately along with different 19- and 20-inch wheel designs, a mechanical limited-slip rear differential, electronic torque vectoring, an adaptive suspension, ceramic composite brakes, front and rear parking sensors, and a sport steering wheel with PDK shift paddles.

 

Interior options include sport seats that can be equipped with heated, ventilated and adaptive features; a heated steering wheel; voice controls; satellite radio, a six-CD changer; interior ambient lighting; and a 10-speaker Bose surround-sound system. Then there are the numerous customization choices that will cover just about any interior surface in leather, aluminum, carbon fiber, wood trim or exterior paint.

 

Serious performance drivers can opt for the Sport Chrono package, which adds dynamic transmission mounts (said to minimize weight transfer during gearchanges), a lap timer, driver-adjustable chassis settings and, with the PDK transmission, launch control.

 

Porsche Boxter Lease Powertrains and Performance

 

The base Boxster is powered by a 2.7-liter horizontally opposed six-cylinder (flat-6) that produces 265 horsepower and 206 pound-feet of torque. The rear-wheel-drive sports car comes standard with a six-speed manual transmission. Optional is a seven-speed dual-clutch automated transmission known as PDK. Porsche says the base Boxster will go from zero to 60 mph in 5.4 seconds regardless of transmission type. Fuel economy is 20 mpg city/30 mpg highway and 24 mpg combined with the manual and 22/32/26 with PDK.

 

The Boxster S comes with a 3.4-liter flat-6 that produces 315 hp and 266 lb-ft of torque. In Edmunds testing, an S model with the manual transmission accelerated from zero to 60 mph in an impressively quick 4.9 seconds. Fuel economy is 20/28/23 combined with the manual and 21/30/24 with PDK.

 

Lease Porsche Boxter Safety

 

Standard safety features for the 2013 Porsche Boxster include antilock disc brakes, stability and traction control, dual thorax and head side-impact airbags and rollover safety hoops above the headrests. In Edmunds brake testing, a Boxster S came to a stop from 60 mph in a short 103 feet.

 

Interior Design and Special Features Porsche Boxter Lease

 

Inside the cabin you'll find the new Boxster's greatest leap compared to the previous one. Addressing a key complaint among taller drivers, the seats are placed lower and there's increased room for both occupants. The interior still features premium materials, and now the gauges, dash and center console borrow from the Panamera's ergonomic elegance. It's a classier look and feel all around.

 

Top-up motoring is now more pleasant, with new sound-deadening material suppressing more ambient noise, although the new Boxster retains its familiar blind spots and compromised top-up visibility. But with a power soft top that folds in 10 seconds, there are fewer excuses to ride around fully enclosed.

 

Although Porsche has stretched the 2013 Boxster, the additional room went into the cabin and, as before, the Boxster still lacks meaningful cargo space. Its two trunks -- one front, one rear -- are pretty small, though combined they total up for about 10 cubic feet of cargo space with the top raised or lowered. You'll have more luck fitting larger items (such as a golf bag) in the SLK.

 

Driving Impressions Porsche Boxter Lease

 

Once underway, there are few driving experiences as fully engrossing as the 2013 Porsche Boxster's. Compact dimensions, modest weight and a midengine layout all help maximize handling ability, and the Boxster manages to feel glued to the road and light on its feet at the same time. Even the new 911 struggles to provide this level of confidence, and we're not the first to observe that a Boxster with equal power might prove to be a better overall package. And while the ride is predictably firm, it's not harsh, and the car settles quickly after encountering road imperfections.

 

Porsche faithful may fret over the Boxster's switch to electric-assist steering, but in our testing we've found the new steering a skilled mimic of a traditional hydraulic-assist setup: meaty in its effort level and mind-warpingly rapid in its actions. We think the new steering will feel transparent and communicative to all but the most seasoned Porsche owner.

 

We haven't yet driven the base-model Boxster with its improved 2.7-liter. If it sounds as good as the previous engine, but packs more power and drinks less fuel, we don't see any downside. The Boxster S, meanwhile, pushes off with authority from low revs, then comes alive and starts to sing when it hits the midrange.

Lease a Porsche Cayman 

Fair warning to our future selves: It's going to be a challenge to write the review for the next-generation Porsche Cayman. Why? Because the current generation, which kicks off with the 2014 Porsche Cayman, is a nearly perfect sports car. It's usually easy to see how a car could be improved, even when it's considered the segment's latest and greatest, but this Cayman has us scratching our heads. Short of giving this coupe wings, or perhaps making it amphibious, we're not sure how Porsche could do any better.

 

However, we certainly wouldn't complain if Porsche gave the 2014 Cayman more power. Given its midengine layout, which makes it inherently better balanced than the rear-engine Porsche 911, the Cayman has the potential to be a superior sports car. But in deference to the 911's illustrious legacy, Porsche steadfastly withholds its top motors from the Cayman lineup. As such, the most capable 2014 Cayman, the S model, is roughly on par engine-wise with the 996-generation 911 Carrera from a decade ago, in spite of the fact that this coupe would be mind-blowingly awesome with, say, the 911 GT3's motor.

 

Also on our short list of quibbles is the Cayman's new electric-assist power steering system. Although the steering effort is spot-on and its precision is inch-perfect, it lacks the tactile feedback that distinguished the original Cayman's steering. It's not a deal breaker, but in the eyes of die-hards, it keeps Porsche's midengine sports car from being truly flawless.

 

Of course, these complaints are balanced against the reality that the 2014 Porsche Cayman is considerably cheaper than the 911. And with the midengine Porsche's seriously compact dimensions, you could even argue that it's a more legitimate heir to the pint-size classic 911s than the current 911 itself. Plus, the Cayman's engines are simply exquisite on their own merits; it's only in comparison with the rest of Porsche's stable that their performance can be questioned.

 

If you're shopping for a new sports car, the 2014 Porsche Cayman merits strong consideration. Notably, it's the only midengine coupe in this price range. Potential rivals include the new BMW 135is, Chevrolet Corvette Stingray, Nissan 370Z and arguably the 911 itself. All are interesting cars, but if you want to own the purest vision of a Porsche sports car, there's no substitute for the 2014 Porsche Cayman.

 

Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options Leasing Porsche Cayman

 

The 2014 Porsche Cayman is a two-seat coupe available in base and S trim levels.

 

Standard equipment on the base Cayman includes 18-inch wheels, summer high-performance tires, an automatically extending rear spoiler, cruise control, air-conditioning, auto stop-start to conserve fuel, an electric parking brake, variable-ratio electric power steering, partial power sport seats (power recline, manual fore/aft and height adjustment), Bluetooth, a 4.6-inch driver information display, a center-mounted 7-inch infotainment touchscreen, and a shockingly Spartan four-speaker sound system with "2 x 25 watt" output per Porsche's specifications. At least you get an auxiliary input jack in the glovebox.

 

The Cayman S adds a bigger engine, bi-xenon headlights, 19-inch wheels, larger front brake discs, red-painted brake calipers and dual exhaust pipes, though it keeps the same bare bones base stereo.

 

Fortunately, you can add a "CDR Plus" audio upgrade that contributes a nine-speaker sound system, an enhanced touchscreen, HD radio, satellite radio and iPod/USB connectivity. Alternatively, you could spring for the Infotainment package, which brings a hard-drive-based navigation system, smartphone integration via the Aha radio app and either a 10-speaker Bose surround-sound system or a 12-speaker Burmester surround-sound system.

 

Other notable technology add-ons include keyless entry/ignition, voice-command functionality, adaptive cruise control (available only on Caymans with the PDK transmission), a convenience package with dual-zone automatic climate control and heated seats, and an "electronic logbook" that automatically records various driving data for subsequent analysis on your computer.

 

While you're upgrading the cabin, there are no fewer than three optional seat designs to consider: 10-way power versions of the base seats, the minimalist Sport Seats Plus (SSP) with racy bolstering (our favorites), and a 14-way power version of SSP called Adaptive Sport Seats Plus. Naturally, there are also countless ways to personalize the interior with distinctive colors and special trim pieces.

 

Moving to the exterior, Porsche offers adaptive bi-xenon headlights, various wheel designs up to 20 inches in diameter, a sport exhaust system (with a cool on/off button on the center console) and a slew of paint options. On the performance front, meanwhile, you can select ceramic composite brakes, electronically controlled dampers (Porsche Active Suspension Management, or PASM), a mechanical rear differential lock with variable torque distribution (Porsche Torque Vectoring, or PTV), speed-sensitive power steering, and a Sport Chrono package that tacks on dynamic transmission mounts, a dash-top stopwatch, a Sport Plus button that essentially puts your Cayman in madman mode and a launch control feature (PDK only).

 

Lease Porsche Cayman Powertrains and Performance

 

The base Cayman is powered by a 2.7-liter horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine (also known as a flat-6 or boxer-6) that produces 275 horsepower and 213 pound-feet of torque. Like every Cayman, the base model employs rear-wheel drive and comes standard with a six-speed manual transmission. Optional is the PDK seven-speed dual-clutch automated manual.

 

In Edmunds testing, the base Cayman with a manual transmission accelerated from zero to 60 mph in 5.8 seconds. EPA fuel economy estimates have improved significantly: The base Cayman returns 20 mpg city/30 mpg highway and 24 mpg combined with the standard six-speed, while PDK creeps up to a remarkable 22/32/26.

 

The Cayman S steps up to a 3.4-liter flat-6 good for 325 hp and 273 lb-ft of torque. In our tests, a Cayman S with PDK needed just 4.5 seconds to hit 60 mph. That's impressively quick, though it's worth noting that the Corvette Stingray is quicker still. Fuel economy remains a strong suit, clocking in at 20/28/23 with the manual and 21/30/24 with PDK.

 

Leasing Porsche Cayman Safety

 

The 2014 Cayman comes standard with antilock brakes, stability control and an array of eight airbags that includes two side airbags and a knee airbag for each passenger.

 

Note that Caymans equipped with adaptive cruise control (ACC) are also treated to Porsche Active Safe, which uses ACC's radar to monitor collision probabilities up to 650 feet in front of the vehicle. The system can operate even when ACC is inactive, and its emergency responses range from simply priming the brakes to applying them with maximum force. If that freaks you out, don't worry: You can turn it off.

 

In Edmunds testing, a base Cayman halted from 60 mph in 103 feet, while an S equipped with highly heat-resistant ceramic-composite brakes required 4 feet more. Unless track days are part of your ownership experience, the standard brakes are more than sufficient.

 

Interior Design and Special Features Porsche Cayman Lease

 

The Cayman's snug interior has always been a defining trait, and that continues for 2014. There are many meaningful improvements inside, though, starting with the sleek, high-mounted center console design that first appeared in the Panamera and has since spread across the Porsche lineup. Throw in superior materials, high-tech displays and some striking color combinations (check out the optional Amber Orange leather upholstery), and you've got a genuinely premium product. The Cayman used to feel like a junior Porsche, but with its newly refined cabin, it gives up little, if anything, to the much more expensive 911.

 

Cargo space is not a Cayman strong suit, however, as inside there just aren't many places to store your stuff, and the cupholders are flimsy. But on the bright side, its midengine layout allows it to have two trunks. The one in front measures 5.3 cubic feet and is handy for a duffel bag, while the rear hatchback/trunk measures a more useful 9.7 cubes.

 

Driving Impressions Leasing a Porsche Cayman

 

If an invigorating sports car driving experience is what you're after, the 2014 Porsche Cayman is one of the best options at any price. Although enthusiasts will no doubt prefer the more potent engine in the Cayman S, both cars deliver the one-of-a-kind experience of a high-revving flat-6 engine wailing directly right behind your head.

 

Critics of the optional dual-clutch automated-manual transmission (PDK) say it detracts from driver involvement. We say: "Phooey." It is true that using the paddles isn't quite as tactilely rewarding as rowing a stick shift, but PDK's shifts are quicker and more precise than you could ever achieve. Plus, PDK actually frees up your attention for other demands, such as picking the proper braking point or acing corners like a pro.

 

 

 

Although the 2014 Cayman's electric power steering system lacks the vivid feedback of the original Cayman's steering, its accuracy through the bends is still second to none and only the most demanding drivers are likely to find fault with it. You can feel the Cayman's midengine balance around those corners, too, egging you on where lesser machines would be begging for mercy.

 

Notably, it's an easier car to drive hard than a 911, as its responses are more predictable and forgiving. Of course you're not going to be drifting a Cayman through turns (like you might in, say, a Corvette Stingray), because even the 3.4-liter motor in the S model isn't stupendously powerful. Overall, though, Porsche's midengine coupe is hard to beat for sheer driving pleasure.

 

Remarkably, the Cayman's supreme handling confidence doesn't translate to a jarring ride in normal operation. We'd be wary of the 20-inch wheels and their itty-bitty sidewalls, but the 19s are compliant enough to make the Cayman a reasonably pleasant road-trip car.

 

Lease a Porsche 911 Carrera 

There are only a handful of iconic cars whose complete redesign is both as highly anticipated as well as utterly feared by car enthusiasts as the Porsche 911. When the seventh-generation 911 debuted last year, people wondered whether the car would still have enough spirit to make it worthy of its iconic name. Now that we've had a year to reflect, we have to say that it was a storm in a teacup. The 2013 Porsche 911 is still very much a 911.

 

Of all the changes wrought on one of the world's most famous sports cars, last year's shift from hydraulic- to electric-assisted steering was one of the most scrutinized. Rest assured Porsche faithful, as the 911 still has lightning reflexes and a jeweler's precision, but is now more capable and more comfortable over a wider range of circumstances.

 

It's rare for any company to release every model and trim variant during a redesign year, and Porsche is no different. To give you an idea of scale, at its maximum number during the previous generation's production, there were 21 distinct Porsche 911 models available. Now in its second year of production, the new Porsche 911 is limited to a relatively skimpy six variants. But there's little reason to fret; with its sublime handling, impressively quick acceleration and everyday usability, even a basic 911 is an utterly fantastic sports car.

 

Of course, there are other choices when it comes to flashy metal. Rivals such as the Aston Martin V8 Vantage, Audi R8, Chevrolet Corvette and Mercedes-Benz SL are all desirable in their own right. But when it comes to a highly evolved and refined front runner, there is no substitute for the 2013 Porsche 911.

 

Porsche 911 Lease Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

 

Last year's partial introduction of the seventh-generation Porsche 911 made things confusing for buyers. There was a dizzying array of 911 variants because some previous "997" generation cars were sold alongside the current "991" versions. With the exception of the potent "997" 911 Turbo, that ends with the 2013 model year when the entire Carrera (coupe) and Cabriolet (convertible) lineup is unified under the "991" roof.

 

The 911 starts in Carrera (coupe) and Carrera Cabriolet (convertible) forms. Up from here, there are the higher-performance "S" models or the all-wheel-drive variants (4 and 4S).

 

The 2013 Porsche Carrera is equipped with 19-inch alloy wheels, automatic bi-xenon headlights, LED turn signals and running lights, heated side mirrors, dual-zone automatic climate control, four-way power-adjustable partial leather sport seats with manual fore/aft adjustment, split-folding rear seats, a manual tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, partial leather interior trim and a faux suede headliner. Standard infotainment is covered by Porsche Communications Management (PCM) that includes a 7-inch touchscreen electronics interface including navigation, Bluetooth phone connectivity and a nine-speaker sound system with a CD player, satellite radio and USB/iPod/auxiliary inputs.

 

The Carrera S version has this equipment plus 20-inch wheels, a more powerful engine, larger brakes and Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) with a lower ride height and selectable Sport or Normal driving modes.

 

The Cabriolet and Cabriolet S models are essentially the same but include a multilayer power soft top and power-operated wind baffle.

 

Notable stand-alone Carrera exterior options include 20-inch wheels, high-gloss anodized aluminum exterior trim, various body parts painted body color rather than the factory standard black, front and rear parking sensors, adaptive bi-xenon headlamps, a rear window wiper, power-folding mirrors, a sunroof in either steel or glass and a rear wing.

 

For the interior, options include various surfaces in paint, leather, wood, aluminum and faux suede as well as colored seatbelts, a full leather interior, full leather seats, heated and/or ventilated front seats, 14- or 18-way power sport seats with driver memory, Sport Seat Plus (standard seats with more side bolstering), a heated steering wheel, multifunction or sport-oriented steering wheels and a power tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel. Adaptive cruise control is also available and includes pre-collision warning and automatic braking.

 

Audio and communications options include voice control of navigation and audio, online services, an electronic trip/economy logbook, satellite and HD Radio.

 

Performance upgrades include a torque-vectoring differential (PTV), ceramic composite brakes, a two-position active suspension (PASM) with a lower ride height, variable power steering and a sport exhaust system.

 

There are also bundled options. The Sport Chrono package includes dynamic engine mounts, a dash-top stopwatch, a performance display, adjustable drive settings, shift light for manual-equipped cars, launch control for PDK cars and a steering wheel display for sport modes. The Premium package comes with auto-dimming mirrors, dynamic bi-xenon headlights, headlight washers and heated power sport seats. The Premium Package Plus adds ventilated seats, keyless entry/ignition and ambient interior lighting. The Bose Audio package has a 12-speaker surround-sound audio system, HD and satellite radio and a six-disc changer. The even more premium Burmester audio package duplicates the above features, but adds more wattage and more sophisticated speakers.

 

Stand-alone Carrera S options are the same as the Carrera (except where noted above as standard on the Carrera S), plus dynamic stabilizer bars (PDCC), a Carrera S Powerkit that further increases output to 430 horsepower and specific engine compartment styling with a titanium-colored cover and carbon inserts.

 

Standard and optional equipment on the Cabriolet/Cabriolet S largely follow those of the Carrera/Carrera S.

 

The all-wheel-drive 911 Turbo (coupe and convertible) rides on 19-inch wheels, a more aggressive suspension tune, unique body styling, full-power front seats, a full leather interior, auto-dimming interior and driver-side mirrors and a 13-speaker Bose surround-sound system. The Turbo S version adds more power, an automated-manual transmission, carbon-ceramic brakes, adaptive sport seats and the availability of special two-tone interior color schemes.

 

Leasing Porsche 911 Powertrains and Performance

 

The 2013 Porsche 911 line is powered by a horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine (two different sizes/outputs). It's connected to a seven-speed manual transmission as standard or a seven-speed automated manual (known as PDK) as an option. Rear drive is used for most 911s, but Carrera 4, 4S and all Turbo models have all-wheel drive.

 

The 2013 Porsche 911 Carrera has a 3.4-liter engine producing 350 hp and 287 pound-feet of torque. Porsche estimates the Coupe will go from zero to 60 mph in 4.4 seconds with the PDK, and in Edmunds testing a PDK-equipped Cabriolet did it in 4.7 seconds. The Carrera S is powered by a 3.8-liter engine that makes 400 hp and 325 lb-ft of torque (430 hp with the optional Carrera S Powerkit). In Edmunds performance testing, a manual-equipped Carrera S coupe went from zero to 60 mph in 4.6 seconds, while a Carrera S PDK did it in 3.9 seconds. A Cabriolet S PDK got to 60 in 4.2 seconds.

 

Fuel economy, of course, varies by model, engine and driveline, but not by much. From most to least efficient variants, the Carrera PDK earns an EPA rating of 20 mpg city/28 highway and 23 mpg combined, to the Carrera 4S Cabriolet with an 18 mpg city/26 mpg highway and 21 mpg combined estimate.

 

The obvious outliers are, of course, the Turbo and Turbo S models. The all-wheel-drive Turbo has a twin-turbocharged 3.8-liter engine that produces 500 hp and 480 lb-ft of torque. The PDK is available, but a six-speed manual is standard. An overboost function cranks the torque output to 516 lb-ft. In Edmunds performance testing of a PDK-equipped coupe, this engine was enough to hit 60 in a staggering 3.2 seconds. The Turbo S, also available as a convertible, should be even quicker, with 530 hp, 516 lb-ft of torque and standard PDK.

 

The entire Turbo line manages to achieve the same EPA-estimated 19 mpg combined regardless of engine output or transmission. Of course, your results may vary.

 

Porsche 911 Lease Safety

 

Every 2013 Porsche 911 comes with antilock ventilated disc brakes, stability control and front, side and side curtain airbags, and knee airbags for the driver and front passenger (except Turbo/Turbo S models). The optional adaptive cruise control system also features automatic brake application if it detects an imminent collision.

 

In Edmunds brake testing, the 911 Carrera S came to a stop from 60 mph in an astounding 98 feet. At the other end of the spectrum, a Cabriolet S required 5 feet more. Given this excellent performance, you'd only need the available ceramic composite brakes if you frequent high-performance driving events.

 

Interior Design and Special Features Leasing a Porsche 911

 

Exceptional build quality and superior materials are consistent throughout the varied Porsche 911 lineup. Leather surfaces are top-notch and plastics are convincingly grained to match. Optional genuine leather, aluminum and carbon fiber are impeccable.

 

Since its introduction in 2012, the redesigned 911 interior features a center console that sweeps upward, creating a unified bridge between the center armrest and dash that's similar to the design Porsche uses for its Panamera sedan. The upside is that the gearshift is conveniently placed closer to the steering wheel; the downside is that the cabin feels less open and spacious than before.

 

The new car's longer wheelbase also translates to added legroom, but only by an inch for the front seats. Rear seats also benefit from added legroom, but are still barely suitable even for small children. Realistically, their flip-down seatbacks create a useful parcel shelf big enough to hold a golf bag. Extremely supportive and comfortable standard front bucket seats do a great job of holding both driver and passenger in place while cornering. The optional seats with more articulation plus heating and ventilating only improve on the excellent design. Roomy foot wells and a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel mean the 911 can accommodate drivers of nearly all sizes.

 

Interior controls are relatively simple to operate, and items like navigation, Bluetooth, the iPod interface and optional voice controls help make this sports car a viable daily driver. There are also plenty of places to stow all manner of personal effects.

 

Driving Impressions Leasing a Porsche 911

 

Any fears that Porsche strayed too far from the winning 911 formula with last year's redesign are completely unfounded. The 2013 Porsche 911 remains an extraordinary sports car. Quicker and more efficient, it now meets an even higher standard of handling and grip. The 991's electric-assisted steering doesn't quite match the previous car's hydraulic-boosted setup for feel, but the system remains incredibly precise, just as before. The flat-6 engine produces strong acceleration and sounds fantastic doing it. At the same time, the 911 is very comfortable over long distances, improving its ability to be an everyday sports car.

 

To this day, the Porsche 911 is the first and only production car to feature a seven-speed manual transmission. It sounds implausible, and the shift pattern embossed on the cue-ball-shaped knob looks outlandish, but in operation 7th gear is locked out until you've first visited 6th gear and then it's just another upshift to the right of 5th. For those who enjoy living with three pedals, Porsche's manual is still one of the finest around.

 

However, to get the best economy, quickest acceleration and seamless shifting performance regardless of engine or driveline, Porsche's PDK automated-manual transmission is overwhelmingly superior to the standard transmission. Porschephiles might say otherwise, but our collective hunch is that they've yet to fully experience the utterly flawless PDK that's worth every cent.

Lease a Porsche Cayenne Review

In China, Porsche is not known as a maker of high-end sports cars. Instead, it is the Cayenne crossover SUV that has buyers from Beijing to Guangzhou sitting on year-long waiting lists just for a chance to bring the most basic model home at a price double that of the American-market version. Size, comfort, opulence and the appeal of a German luxury badge are its primary selling points.

The Porsche Cayenne is one of the most appealing midsize luxury crossovers thanks to its sophisticated engineering, impeccable construction, immense features list and surprisingly useful cabin. True, it doesn't boast a third-row seat or the massive cargo capacity of larger crossovers, but its sliding, reclining and folding rear seat adds a degree of versatility that other luxury SUVs lack. With the new 2013 Cayenne Diesel model and the carry-over Cayenne S Hybrid, good fuel economy also becomes a strong selling point.

Yet this is the United States, and a Porsche needs to live up to those decades of high-performance expectations. And despite the lamentations of dedicated automotive purists, the Cayenne earns its Porsche crest by being one of the most rewarding and involving SUVs to drive on the highway. Handling is exceptional, and it only gets better as you select certain high-tech chassis-enhancing options or go whole-hog with the new sport-tuned 2013 Cayenne GTS. And although a basic V6 Cayenne might be worth waiting for in China, it's the 29-mpg Cayenne Diesel, 400-horsepower Cayenne S and 500-hp Cayenne Turbo that draw attention on this side of the Pacific. Indeed, the Turbo is quicker than many sports cars.

Frankly, the 2013 Porsche Cayenne would be an easy choice if it wasn't for prices that are high even here in America -- and as with all Porsches, the prices only get higher when you start sampling from the lengthy list of options. As such, looking around would be a wise decision. The BMW X5, Infiniti FX and Mercedes-Benz M-Class all deliver a similar degree of luxury, practicality, performance and model variety for considerably less money. The Cayenne's sophisticated engineering and impeccable construction are certainly worth something, but you're still paying extra for that badge. Yet from Tampa Bay to Beijing, this seems like something that people are more than happy to do.

Porsche Cayenne Lease Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

The 2013 Porsche Cayenne is a five-passenger midsize SUV available in six different models that mostly differ by engine.

The base Cayenne, Cayenne S, Cayenne Diesel and Cayenne S Hybrid come standard with 18-inch wheels, automatic headlights, LED running lights, front and rear foglamps, rear privacy glass, a power liftgate (with separately opening window), automatic wipers, heated washer nozzles, heated mirrors, cruise control, dual-zone automatic climate control, eight-way power front seats with four-way lumbar adjustment and driver memory functions, a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, leather upholstery, a 40/20/40 rear seat (slides, reclines, folds), Bluetooth phone connectivity and a 10-speaker sound system with a touchscreen display, CD player, an auxiliary audio jack and an iPod/USB audio interface. The S Hybrid also comes with an enhanced speed-sensitive power steering system that is optional on these other trims.

The Cayenne GTS gets the above equipment plus Porsche's active suspension system with adjustable ride height (known as PASM), a lower ride height to improve highway handling, 20-inch wheels, a different final-drive ratio, upgraded brakes, the enhanced speed-sensitive steering, adaptive bi-xenon headlights, the Turbo's more aggressive front fascia, the SportDesign exterior body kit package, front and rear GTS-specific sport seats, a sport steering wheel and extensive use of faux suede in the interior. Many of these items are available separately on the lower trims.

Besides its turbocharged engine, the Cayenne Turbo includes a variety of items that are optional on the lower trims. These include 19-inch wheels, PASM, adaptive bi-xenon headlights, 14-way power front sport seats with four-way lumbar adjustment and memory functions, heated front and rear seats, a heated power-adjustable steering wheel, a faux-suede headliner, a navigation system and a 14-speaker Bose surround-sound audio system with satellite radio. Ten-way power "Comfort" front seats with less aggressive bolstering are a no-cost option.

As with any Porsche, the amount of optional equipment available on all Cayenne models is exhaustive. Exterior and mechanical items include different wheels, an active antiroll suspension system (Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control), a side-to-side torque-vectoring rear differential (PTV Plus), ceramic composite brakes, skid plates, running boards, roof rails, a panoramic sunroof, a regular sunroof, a heated windshield and noise-insulated privacy glass. Interior comfort and design items include four-zone automatic climate control, power rear side sunshades, ventilated front seats, a Porsche-designed child safety seat, interior ambient light, extended leather interior trim, different leather seat finishes and a nearly endless array of customizable trim pieces capable of being covered in leather or other trim types. Electronic items include a rearview camera (includes front and rear parking sensors), keyless ignition/entry, adaptive cruise control, a blind-spot warning system, voice controls, a six-CD changer, a dual-screen rear seat entertainment system and a 16-speaker Burmester surround-sound audio system.

Powertrains and Performance Leasing a Porsche Cayenne

The base 2013 Porsche Cayenne comes with a 3.6-liter V6 that produces 300 hp and 295 pound-feet of torque. As on every Cayenne, all-wheel drive is standard. A six-speed manual transmission is standard; an eight-speed automatic is optional and includes an automatic stop/start system for reduced fuel consumption. Porsche estimates this engine will bring the Cayenne from zero to 60 mph in 7.4 seconds with the automatic (7.1 for the manual), which would be a little slower than average for a six-cylinder luxury SUV. EPA-estimated fuel economy with the automatic is 17 mpg city/23 mpg highway and 19 mpg combined. It drops to 15/22/17 with the manual.

The Cayenne Diesel features a turbocharged 3.0-liter V6 diesel that produces 240 hp and 406 lb-ft of torque. The eight-speed automatic is standard. Porsche says the diesel Cayenne will hit 60 mph in 7.4 seconds, which is quick for a diesel engine. EPA-estimated fuel economy is an excellent 19/29/23.

The Cayenne S represents a substantial upgrade, with its 4.8-liter V8 good for 400 hp and 369 lb-ft of torque. As with every V8 Cayenne, the eight-speed automatic with auto stop/start is standard. Porsche estimates the S will hit 60 mph in 5.4 seconds. EPA-estimated fuel economy is nearly equal to the V6 at 16/22/18.

The Cayenne S Hybrid features a supercharged 3.0-liter V6 attached to a 34kW electric motor. Combined, this hybrid powertrain produces 380 hp and 427 lb-ft of torque. EPA-estimated fuel economy is worse than that of the diesel at 20/24/21, but acceleration is stronger. In Edmunds performance testing, it hit 60 mph in 6.1 seconds.

The Cayenne GTS gets an upgraded version of the S engine good for 420 hp and 380 lb-ft of torque. Its 0-60 time is estimated to be the same as the Cayenne S. EPA-estimated fuel economy stands at 15/21/17.

The Cayenne Turbo gets a turbocharged 4.8-liter V8 good for 500 hp and 516 lb-ft of torque. In Edmunds performance testing, the Turbo hit 60 mph in 4.6 seconds, which makes it one of the quickest SUVs on the planet. EPA-estimated fuel economy is 15/22/17. The Turbo Powerkit bumps output up to 540 hp and 553 lb-ft of torque.

Regardless of trim, each Cayenne equipped with the eight-speed automatic is rated to tow as much as 7,716 pounds.

Porsche Cayenne Lease Safety

The 2013 Porsche Cayenne comes standard with antilock brakes with enhanced brake assist and readiness, stability and traction control, driver knee airbag, front side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags. Rear side airbags, parking sensors, a rearview camera and a blind-spot warning system are available.

In Edmunds brake testing, the Cayenne Turbo came to a stop from 60 mph in 108 feet, which is exceptional for any vehicle, especially an SUV. With its regenerative brakes, the Cayenne S Hybrid fared worse with a stop of 120 feet, but that's still acceptable in this class.

Interior Design and Special Features Porsche Cayenne Lease

The Cayenne features a sophisticated cockpit-style layout similar to most Porsche sports cars. The center console, adorned with upwards of 50 buttons, rises to meet the dash and large touchscreen display, creating an enveloping driver's environment. With so many buttons, it can be difficult to quickly find what you're looking for, but you might argue that this Porsche system is more efficient than the menu-driven systems found in its competitors.

Like other Porsches, the Cayenne features fine interior materials put together with excellent craftsmanship. Handsome wood, alloy trim and leather upholstery further add to the luxurious ambience, plus you can add even more leather and wood along with carbon or faux suede thanks to the exhaustive options list. The front seats are available in three different designs, ranging from simple eight-way power adjustment to the 14-way sport seats, which feature adjustable bolsters, lumbar and seat cushion length. The sculpted rear seats not only recline but also slide fore and aft as well.

The Cayenne has a maximum luggage capacity of 62.9 cubic feet (a figure reduced to 59.7 and 60.2, respectively for the Hybrid and Turbo models). This is on the small side for the Cayenne's class.

Lease a Porsche Cayenne Driving Impressions

Few luxury SUVs come with such a wide variety of powertrain options. The base V6 delivers merely average acceleration, but it's not what anyone would describe as pokey. The same could be said of the new Porsche Cayenne Diesel, which tends to feel stronger around town thanks to its torque-rich power delivery. It also achieves very strong fuel economy for a luxury SUV and actually outdoes the more expensive (and admittedly quicker) Cayenne S Hybrid. If you don't need thrilling straight-line performance, the Diesel is a great choice.

Even on these less performance-oriented Cayennes, highway handling is impressive and the steering deserves special praise for its linearity and precision. Body roll is well controlled and the Cayenne can be hustled along with gusto, helped by a rear-biased all-wheel-drive system that delivers 60 percent of its thrust to the rear wheels under normal conditions. The optional active suspension system provides a supple ride even with the dampers in their most aggressive setting. As a result, the Cayenne is an excellent candidate for long-distance driving and even light off-roading. The optional active stabilizer bar system and torque-vectoring (power-directing) differential make the Cayenne even better on the road.

We're not going to lie, however; the best way to exploit these dynamic talents is with one of the powerful V8 engines. All by itself, the acceleration of the Cayenne Turbo earns it a place in a very exclusive club. Add the optional power upgrade, racing-bred carbon-ceramic brakes and all the available suspension and drivetrain upgrades, and there are few sports cars (let alone SUVs) that can keep up with the 2013 Porsche Cayenne.

 

Lease a Porsche 911

For 50 years, the Porsche 911 has been the quintessential sports car. Through the decades, it has remained true to its roots as a serious performer, with enough refinement and innovation to appeal to more sophisticated drivers with deeper pockets. Rather than explode onto the scene with a completely reworked 911 every generation, Porsche's top sports car has evolved, edging ever closer to perfection.

 

The latest 2014 Porsche 911 lineup follows this tradition, providing stunning performance, decadent luxury and all-day comfort in a single package. This year, its performance threshold increases, as the new-generation 911 Turbo, Turbo S and GT3 models join the lineup. The new Turbo and Turbo S get a turbocharged 3.8-liter six-cylinder that belts out 520 horsepower in the Turbo and 560 hp in the Turbo S. All-wheel drive is again standard, though the Turbo models do have a new four-wheel steering system. Also new: Porsche is only equipping them with the seven-speed automated manual (PDK) transmission.

 

No disrespect to the Turbo S -- it's the fastest 911 on the lot -- but the GT3 is still the baddest Porsche on the block. This track-oriented model features a normally aspirated 3.8-liter six-cylinder good for 475 hp and a hair-raising 9,000-rpm redline. The new four-wheel steering system is used here as well, as is the PDK transmission (but with special tuning for GT3 use). Note that PDK is standard -- this is the first Porsche 911 GT3 not offered with a conventional manual gearbox.

 

With 12 Porsche 911 models available, not to mention hundreds of options, there's undoubtedly one to suit you. To commemorate this year's milestone, there's even a 50th Anniversary edition that goes beyond simple badging and adds real performance in the form of a horsepower bump. But even the base 911 Carrera is sure to please even the most jaded of sports car drivers with its intoxicating blend of power, handling and sensory input.

 

Of course, the 2014 Porsche 911 isn't the only choice out there for a sports car. Depending on your priorities, other cars like the Aston Martin V8 Vantage, Audi R8, Jaguar F-Type, Mercedes SL-Class or SLS AMG GT, Nissan GT-R or SRT Viper might work out better for you. But the Porsche's all-around appeal is hard to beat, especially if you want a car you can drive every day. Fifty years on, the 2014 Porsche 911 is quite simply perfection evolved.

 

Porsche Lease Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options 

 

The four-seat 2014 Porsche 911 features a deep roster of trim levels and distinct models. The base model 911 Carrera starts with 19-inch alloy wheels with summer tires, automatic bi-xenon headlights, heated mirrors, full power accessories, dual-zone automatic climate control, four-way adjustable power seats (with manual fore-aft), a tilt-and-telescoping steering wheel, leather upholstery, a 7-inch touchscreen display, a navigation system, Bluetooth and a nine-speaker audio system with CD player and USB/iPod interface.

 

The Carrera 4 is similarly equipped, with the addition of slightly wider rear fenders and all-wheel drive. The rear-wheel-drive Carrera S adds a more powerful engine, 20-inch wheels, a slightly lower ride height, adaptive suspension dampers (PASM) and a torque-vectoring rear differential. The Carrera 4S includes the same features, along with all-wheel drive.

 

Convertible Cabriolet versions are offered for each of the above four models. They have a power-operated cloth top and wind blocker that deploys behind the front seats.

 

For 2014, a special 50th Anniversary 911 coupe model is offered that features all of the Carrera S items, along with a more powerful engine, retro-styled wheels, the 4S model's wider rear bodywork, 10-way power-adjustable front seats (with four-way lumbar), driver memory settings, a power-adjustable steering wheel and unique interior and exterior trim.

 

The new 911 Turbo coupe features even more power, a fixed rear spoiler with articulating wing elements, some aesthetic and aerodynamic body revisions, a rear-wheel steering feature (that both tightens up the car's turn radius and improves stability during lane changes), adaptive headlights and a 12-speaker Bose surround-sound audio system (with smartphone app integration). The Turbo S model turns the power output up even higher and adds LED headlights, automatic high-beam control, 14-way power-adjustable front seats and carbon-fiber interior trim.

 

Finally, there's the track-focused two-seat 911 GT3 coupe with power output that places it between the 50th Anniversary and Turbo models. Features are similar to the Turbo model with the addition of a "Track" driving mode.

 

Many of the upper trim features are available as options on supporting models. There is a wealth of other optional add-ons that are bundled in packages or à la carte. Option highlights (depending on the model) include various wheel designs, ceramic-composite brake rotors, dynamic engine mounts, a sport suspension, active antiroll bars (PDCC), power-folding mirrors, roof rack mounting points, a sunroof, keyless ignition/entry, front and rear parking sensors, adaptive cruise control, heated and ventilated front seats, a heated and/or multifunction steering wheel, auto-dimming mirrors, an upgraded trip computer, a dash-mounted stopwatch, voice control, a 12-speaker Burmester premium audio system, a six-CD changer, satellite radio and HD radio.

 

Time and budget allowing, buyers can further customize their 911 with seemingly endless interior treatments, from leather texture to trim material and seatbelt colors.

 

Powertrains and Performance Porsche Lease

 

The base 911 Carrera models are powered by 3.4-liter horizontally opposed six-cylinder engines that produce 350 hp and 287 pound-feet of torque. A seven-speed manual transmission is standard and sends power to the rear wheels, with a seven-speed automated manual transmission (called PDK) offered as an option. Selecting the Sport Chrono package provides additional driver-selectable shift modes for the PDK, plus launch control.

 

Carrera S models receive a 3.8-liter engine that increases output to 400 hp and 325 lb-ft of torque. Opting for the Carrera S Powerkit increases output to 430 hp. The 50th Anniversary model's 3.8-liter engine receives the Powerkit upgrade as standard.

 

Porsche 911 models with the 4 and 4S designations denote all-wheel drive and mirror the Carrera and Carrera S engine specs, respectively.

 

The 911 Turbo has a turbocharged 3.8-liter six-cylinder that generates 520 hp and 487 lb-ft (524 lb-ft with a temporary overboost function). The Turbo S further increases power to 560 hp and 516 lb-ft (553 lb-ft in overboost). The GT3's normally aspirated 3.8-liter six-cylinder makes 475 hp and 325 lb-ft of torque. The Turbo models and the GT3 are only available with the seven-speed PDK transmission. All-wheel drive is standard for the Turbo models, while the GT3 is rear-drive only.

 

In Edmunds testing of a Carrera Cabriolet with PDK, we recorded a 4.8-second 0-60 mph time with launch control. More impressive was a Carrera S coupe with PDK; it accelerated to 60 mph in just 3.9 seconds (again, using launch control). Porsche says the Turbo sprints to 60 mph in 3.2 seconds (3.0 with launch control), the Turbo S in a blistering 2.9 seconds and the GT3 in 3.3 seconds.

 

Despite the impressive performance, Porsche's 911 lineup also produces respectable fuel economy numbers. The base 911 Carrera and Carrera 4 are rated at an EPA-estimated 23 mpg combined (20 city/28 highway) with the PDK transmission. The seven-speed manual Carrera and Carrera S models are rated 1 mpg lower across the board. The Carrera 4S is rated at 22 mpg combined (19 city/26 highway) with PDK and 21 mpg combined (18 city/26 highway) with the manual.

 

Safety Leasing Porsche

 

Standard safety features for all 2014 Porsche 911 models include antilock disc brakes, traction and stability control, and side thorax, head and knee airbags for the front seats. Adaptive headlights and parking sensors are available as an option, but a rearview camera is not offered. The optional adaptive cruise control also includes a forward collision warning and mitigation system, which can apply the brakes if no action is taken.

 

In Edmunds brake testing, the 911 Carrera S came to a stop from 60 mph in an astounding 98 feet. At the other end of the spectrum, a Cabriolet S required 5 feet more. Given this excellent performance, you'd only need the available ceramic-composite brakes if you frequent high-performance driving events.

 

Interior Design and Special Features Lease Porsche

 

Throughout much of the Porsche 911's storied history, interior quality has been class-leading, with improvements along the way. Today's 911 is downright luxurious, with top-notch leather upholstery (and even more leather coverings available as an option) and plastic panels that are convincingly grained to match. Trim elements in aluminum and carbon fiber are equally praiseworthy.

 

Up front, some Porsche purists might bemoan the reduced spaciousness between the seats. Where there used to be an open expanse, there's now a center console that sweeps from the armrest to the dash. The upside is, it provides a comfortable armrest and places the gearshift closer to the steering wheel. Purists aside, we consider it a step forward.

 

The front seats still provide a surprising amount of space for larger adults, considering the 911's smaller exterior appearance. There are several seat choices, with varying degrees for sport-oriented support, but all of them supply ample lateral support to hold you in during enthusiastic cornering and enough cushioning to provide all-day comfort. There is also a wealth of head- and legroom, as well as seat/wheel adjustments to make tall drivers comfortable. The rear seats, however, are ill suited to even the smallest of passengers and are better suited to handling the overflow from the small 5.1-cubic-foot luggage compartment up front.

 

On the whole, the Porsche 911 is suitable for daily use, thanks to thoughtful design and modern amenities. Navigation, smartphone and audio functions are easily tackled through the touchscreen interface and numerous physical buttons. There's also an additional stalk coming off the steering column that acts as a redundant multifunction controller. Interior storage is passable by sports-car standards, but none of the slots are particularly large and the cupholders won't hold anything larger or heavier than a cup of coffee.

 

Lease a Porsche Driving Impressions 

 

The 2014 Porsche 911 remains true to its performance and racing heritage, while providing an agreeable ride quality for long-distance touring. The electric-assist power steering that's now used on all 911 models lacks some of the feel of the old hydraulic system, but it's still brilliant in the way it communicates what's happening at the wheels and consequently builds your confidence during enthusiastic driving.

 

Power from the flat-six-cylinder engine is robust, even in base Carrera trim. Upgrading to S, GT3 and Turbo models is really only justified for the most power-hungry and talented of drivers. As an added bonus, all of these 911s sound great under spirited acceleration.

 

Historically, a manual transmission was the only true choice for those who enjoy a thrilling romp on twisting roads or a racetrack, but Porsche's PDK automated manual should change all of that. Shifts are executed with an urgency and perfection that even the best professional drivers would find nearly impossible to duplicate with a traditional manual. Going with PDK also allows a driver to focus his energies on driving well, and as an added bonus, PDK-equipped models are eligible for the Sport Chrono launch control option. That said, the seven-speed manual is still one of the best being made today, so if you like shifting your own gears, you won't be disappointed with it.

Lease a Porsche Cayenne

If there's one thing the 2014 Porsche Cayenne needed, it was more power; after all, the best last year's Cayenne could do was 500 horsepower in Turbo guise. Clearly, we jest. On the list of thoughts you're likely to have behind the wheel of a Cayenne Turbo, "needs more power" ranks well behind "Whose deranged idea was this frightening machine?" But Porsche had to do something, so what the hey, why not give the Turbo a 10 percent hp boost and call this new creation the Cayenne Turbo S?

 

So it was that the Porsche Cayenne Turbo S became the big news for 2014, effectively replacing last year's optional "power kit" for the Turbo. In addition to its 550-hp V8, the Turbo S builds on the Turbo's standard air suspension and electronically adjustable dampers (PASM in Porsche-speak) by adding active antiroll technology (which Porsche calls Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control or PDCC) and side-to-side torque-vectoring with an electronically controlled rear differential lock (PTV Plus). That's all pretty neat, but to be honest, you can get the same basic setup on the regular Turbo by tacking on PDCC and PTV Plus as options. In other words, the Turbo S is mainly about extracting a little more power from the Turbo's engine, along with a little more green from your wallet.

 

Otherwise, the 2014 Porsche Cayenne is essentially unchanged from the previous year, and that's just fine by us. It's still one of the best-driving luxury SUVs on the block, and there's an incredible variety of engines to choose from, including an efficient turbodiesel V6 and a few different versions of Porsche's stellar 4.8-liter V8. You can even get a quirky hybrid variant that boasts 380 horses of its own. Off-road ability is diminished relative to the original Cayenne, but this second-generation model is considerably lighter, so it provides a better real-world mix of agility and all-weather traction. Its interior is a home run, too, ranking with the best in terms of materials quality, style and attention to detail.

 

The world may not have needed a more powerful Cayenne, but Porsche's high rider continues to be a beacon in the sea of luxury crossovers. Of course, you might also want to take a look at rivals such as the BMW X5 and X5 M, Mercedes-Benz M-Class and the Land Rover Range Rover and Range Rover Sport, which have strong engines and elegant interiors of their own. But if you're looking for the most dynamic vehicle in this segment, the 2014 Porsche Cayenne is a fine choice.

 

Porsche Cayenne Lease Body Styles, Trim Levels, and Options

 

The 2014 Porsche Cayenne is a five-passenger midsize SUV available in seven models: base Cayenne, Cayenne Diesel, Cayenne S, Cayenne S Hybrid, Cayenne GTS, Cayenne Turbo and Cayenne Turbo S. They mostly differ by engine.

 

The base Cayenne, Cayenne Diesel, Cayenne S and Cayenne S Hybrid come standard with 18-inch wheels, automatic headlights, LED running lights, front and rear foglamps, rear privacy glass, a power liftgate (with separately opening window), automatic wipers, heated washer nozzles, heated mirrors, cruise control, dual-zone automatic climate control, eight-way power front seats with optional driver memory functions, leather upholstery, a 40/20/40 split-folding rear seat that slides and reclines, Bluetooth phone connectivity and a 10-speaker sound system with a 7-inch touchscreen display (an 11-speaker system with iPod/USB connectivity is available at extra cost). The S Hybrid also comes with an enhanced speed-sensitive power steering system that's optional on other Cayennes.

 

The Cayenne GTS adds Porsche's active air suspension system with adjustable ride height (known as PASM), a lower stance overall, 20-inch wheels, a different final-drive ratio, upgraded brakes, adaptive bi-xenon headlights, the Turbo's more aggressive front fascia, the SportDesign exterior body kit package, GTS-specific sport front seats, a sport steering wheel and extensive use of faux suede in the interior.

 

Besides its turbocharged engine, the Cayenne Turbo includes 19-inch wheels, PASM, adaptive bi-xenon headlights, 14-way adjustable front sport seats with driver and passenger memory functions, a power-adjustable steering column, heated front and rear seats, a heated power-adjustable steering wheel, a faux-suede headliner, a navigation system and a 14-speaker Bose surround-sound audio system with satellite radio. You can get 10-way adjustable front seats with less aggressive lateral bolstering as a no-cost option.

 

The Turbo S adds even more power, 21-inch "911 Turbo II" wheels, high-gloss black exterior trim, uniquely styled exhaust tips, the Sport Chrono package with a dash-mounted timer and exclusive two-tone interior designs. It also features standard handling upgrades in the form of an active antiroll suspension system (PDCC) and a side-to-side torque-vectoring rear differential (PTV Plus).

 

Note that many of the higher trims' standard features are optional on lesser models.

 

As with any Porsche, there are enough options to double your Cayenne's base price if you check off enough of them. Exterior and mechanical items include different wheels (ranging from 18-21 inches in diameter), ceramic composite brakes, skid plates, off-road underbody protection, running boards, roof rails, a sunroof (regular or panoramic), a heated windshield and noise-insulated privacy glass. Interior comfort and design items include four-zone automatic climate control, power rear side sunshades, ventilated front seats and a seemingly endless array of customizable interior bits (leather-trimmed air vent slats, anyone?). Available electronics include a rearview camera with parking sensors, keyless ignition/entry, adaptive cruise control, a blind-spot warning system, voice-command functionality, a dual-screen rear seat entertainment system and a 16-speaker Burmester surround-sound audio system.

 

Powertrains and Performance Leasing a Porsche Cayenne

 

All-wheel drive is standard on every Cayenne, but there are two types: The Cayenne Diesel and Cayenne S Hybrid feature a permanent AWD system with a self-locking center differential, while the other models come with an active AWD system that offers variable torque distribution and multiple off-road modes.

 

The base 2014 Porsche Cayenne is powered by a 3.6-liter V6 that produces 300 hp and 295 pound-feet of torque. Believe it or not, a six-speed manual transmission is standard. Optional is Porsche's eight-speed Tiptronic S automatic transmission, which includes an automatic stop-start system for reduced fuel consumption. Porsche estimates this engine will bring the Cayenne from zero to 60 mph in 7.4 seconds with the automatic (7.1 with the manual), a rather leisurely performance for a luxury SUV. EPA-estimated fuel economy with the automatic is a lackluster 17 mpg city/23 mpg highway and 19 mpg combined, dropping to 15/22/17 with the manual.

 

The Cayenne Diesel features a turbocharged 3.0-liter V6 diesel that produces 240 hp and 406 lb-ft of torque. As with every Cayenne other than the base version, the eight-speed automatic is standard. Porsche says the diesel Cayenne will hit 60 mph in 7.2 seconds. EPA-estimated fuel economy is a laudable 19/29/23.

 

The Cayenne S represents a substantial upgrade, with its 4.8-liter V8 good for 400 hp and 369 lb-ft of torque. Porsche estimates the S will hit 60 mph in 5.6 seconds. EPA-estimated fuel economy roughly equals that of the V6 at 16/22/18.

 

The Cayenne S Hybrid features a supercharged 3.0-liter V6 attached to a 34kW electric motor. Combined, this hybrid powertrain produces 380 hp and 427 lb-ft of torque. EPA-estimated mpg, at 20/24/21, is lower than that of the Cayenne Diesel, but acceleration is stronger: In Edmunds performance testing, the Cayenne S Hybrid hit 60 mph in 6.1 seconds.

 

The Cayenne GTS gets an upgraded version of the S engine good for 420 hp and 380 lb-ft of torque. Its 0-60 time is pegged by Porsche at 5.4 seconds. EPA-estimated fuel economy stands at 15/21/17.

 

The Cayenne Turbo gets a turbocharged 4.8-liter V8 good for 500 hp and 516 lb-ft of torque. In Edmunds performance testing, the Turbo hit 60 mph in 4.6 seconds. EPA estimated fuel economy is 15/22/17.

 

The range-topping Turbo S squeezes 550 hp and 553 lb-ft of torque out of that turbocharged V8. Porsche estimates a 0-60 sprint of 4.3 seconds, while the EPA estimates fuel economy of 14/20/16.

 

Regardless of trim, each Cayenne with the eight-speed automatic is rated to tow up to 7,716 pounds when properly equipped.

 

Porsche Cayenne Lease Safety 

 

The 2014 Porsche Cayenne comes standard with antilock brakes with enhanced brake assist and readiness, stability and traction control, a driver knee airbag, front side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags. Rear side airbags, parking sensors, a rearview camera and a blind-spot warning system are available.

 

In Edmunds brake testing, the Cayenne Turbo came to a stop from 60 mph in 108 feet, while the Cayenne Diesel stopped in 109 feet. These are exceptional braking distances for an SUV. With its regenerative braking system, the Cayenne S Hybrid fared worse with a stop of 120 feet, but that's still acceptable in this class.

 

Leasing Porsche Cayenne Interior Design and Special Features

 

The Cayenne features the sophisticated cockpit-style layout for which contemporary Porsches are known. The center console, adorned with upward of 50 buttons, rises to meet the dash and its large touchscreen display, creating an enveloping driver's environment. With so many buttons, it can be difficult to find what you're looking for at first, but the touchscreen menus are straightforward and the system is quick to process inputs. Overall, it's a solid system and not any more difficult to use than the dial/knob-based systems in rival luxury SUVs.

 

Like other Porsches, the Cayenne features high-end interior materials and excellent build quality. Handsome wood inserts, alloy trim and leather upholstery create a luxurious ambience, and you can add even more leather and wood if you like, not to mention carbon fiber and/or faux suede embellishments. The front seats are available in three designs, ranging from simple eight-way power adjustment to 14-way sport seats with adjustable bolsters, lumbar and seat-cushion length. The sculpted rear seats not only recline, but also slide fore and aft.

 

The Cayenne has a maximum luggage capacity of 62.9 cubic feet, a figure reduced to 59.7 and 60.2 for the Hybrid and Turbo models, respectively. This is on the small side for the Cayenne's class.

 

Driving Impressions Porsche Cayenne Lease

 

Few luxury SUVs come with such a wide variety of powertrain options. The base V6 delivers merely average acceleration, but the turbodiesel V6 adds a satisfying slab of low-end torque, while the Cayenne S Hybrid is downright quick off the line. Still, the Cayenne feels best with one of the four available V8s under the hood. They're all based on the same 4.8-liter configuration, but their characters differ dramatically -- the S version is relatively smooth and quiet, while the GTS channels Porsche's racing heritage. The two Turbo variants are just plumb crazy.

 

Even on less performance-oriented Porsche Cayennes, handling is impressive by crossover standards. The steering deserves special praise for its precision and sporty feel. In addition, the Cayenne maintains a high level of composure when you're going around turns at speed (all the more so with PDCC aboard) and can generally be driven like a sport sedan whenever the mood strikes. The rear-biased AWD system helps out here, as it delivers 60 percent of engine power to the rear wheels under normal conditions.

 

In spite of the priority given to athletic handling, the ride is remarkably supple, making the 2014 Porsche Cayenne an excellent candidate for long-distance trips and even light-duty off-roading. One of our few complaints about Porsche's SUV is the Cayenne S Hybrid's regenerative braking system, which although effective, makes it difficult to bring the vehicle to a stop smoothly in city traffic.